Energy

  • Trump's 'Huge Mistake'

    US President Donald J. Trump’s decision to take the United States out of a global agreement that seeks to limit the damage caused by climate change is “shortsighted and reckless,” a “huge mistake,” and cedes US energy leadership to China and Europe, according to Atlantic Council analysts.

    “The president’s decision to withdraw from Paris is a huge mistake. There is no upside,” said Richard Morningstar, founding director and chairman of the Atlantic Council’s Global Energy Center. 

    “This decision will make it more difficult to work with our friends and allies on a whole host of critical foreign policy and national security issues. It will make it more difficult for our companies to work in many countries,” he added.

    Trump announced his decision at the White House on June 1.

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  • Creating a More Competitive Energy Market in Europe

    One of the key characteristics—and potential vulnerabilities—of the European energy market is its dependence on imports. The European Commission has drawn up a list of 195 key energy infrastructure projects, known as Projects of Common Interest (PCI), to create a more competitive energy market and alleviate this dependence. Some of these projects could considerably improve the competitiveness and reliability of Southern European energy markets.

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  • Scholl in the Berlin Policy Journal: Beyond the Beltway


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  • Downstream Oil Theft: Implications and Next Steps

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    On January 13, 2017, the Atlantic Council launched a major study on downstream oil theft at its inaugural Global Energy Forum in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. Downstream Oil Theft: Implications and Next Steps draws on the launch event to examine the implications of the study's findings and to suggest tangible next steps in both further investigating this global scourge and beginning to confront it effectively. 

     
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  • The Tether of Fuel—a Brief Counterpoint

    Unless troops live off the land again, energy efficiency can only yield so much.

    Colonel Greg Douquet's views on the future of battlefield energy sound neat, and one can see how these might be able to mitigate the fuel needs of electrical generators. Perhaps it’s harder to imagine what “low signature” wind and solar generating systems are. Ultimately, the idea can just sound like more kit to haul around to power some radios and laptops, but ultimately, not save all that much fuel.

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  • The Tether of Fuel—a Brief Counterpoint

    Unless troops live off the land again, energy efficiency can only yield so much.

    Colonel Greg Douquet's views on the future of battlefield energy sound neat, and one can see how these might be able to mitigate the fuel needs of electrical generators. Perhaps it’s harder to imagine what “low signature” wind and solar generating systems are. Ultimately, the idea can just sound like more kit to haul around to power some radios and laptops, but ultimately, not save all that much fuel.

    Read More
  • “Unleash Us From the Tether of Fuel”

    Innovation in energy can be a force multiplier on the battlefield.

    In March 2003, the commander of the US Army’s Fifth Corps, General William Wallace, was again reminded of the timeless axiom that amateurs talk tactics, but professionals study logistics. His massive and powerful formation, the main effort against the Iraqi Republican Guard, was “operationally paused.” The general feared that his thinly protected lines of communication were compromised by deliberate targeting from Sadam Fedayeen, and that his troops would lose access to vital supplies coming from the Port of Kuwait. As the world watched, media and political leaders were starting to term the situation a “quagmire.”

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  • Getting the Most Out of Renewables

    Nearly half of the Fortune 500companies, including Apple, Facebook, General Motors, Google, Target, and Wal-Mart, have announced sustainability and/or clean energy targets. Non-utility customers accounted for 52 percent of last year’s 4,000 megawatts of US wind deals, and US companies represented 907 megawatts of solar in 2015—a nearly 60 percent increase over the previous year.

    However, procurement strategy isn’t evolving with the rate of adoption. The private sector’s attachment to the long-term power-purchase agreement (PPA) threatens the reputation of the renewables...

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  • White House Hopeful India Will Ratify Paris Climate Deal This Year

    The White House is optimistic that India, a major polluter, will this year ratify the Paris climate agreement, increasing the likelihood that the deal that is intended to cut greenhouse gas emissions will come into effect before US President Barack Obama leaves office in January of 2017.

    “We are very, very committed to seeing this enter into force as soon as possible this year, and that was a real objective of this administration. I think we’re feeling pretty confident that we’ll get there,” John Morton, senior director for energy security and climate at the National Security Council, said at the Atlantic Council on September 12.

    With regards to India’s ratification of the agreement, he added: “We are pushing them [India], and they are pushing themselves. We’re optimistic we’ll get there with or without them, although better with them for...

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  • Iran Sanctions Update: Political and Investment Environment

    Our panelists, Chris Bakemeyer, David Mortlock, and Barbara Slavin discussed the outlook for investment in Iran, the ongoing status of existing sanctions, and the broader context of US policy towards Iran. They delved into the implications of these trends both for policymakers and private sector leaders considering investment opportunities in Iran. Richard Morningstar, Founding Director and Chairman of the Global Energy Center, delivered welcoming remarks and Yeganeh Torbati of Reuters moderated the discussion.