Global Energy Center

  • The OPEC Meeting and the United States: The Elephant Not in the Room

    The geopolitics and economics of oil appear set to collide at this Friday’s OPEC meeting and Saturday’s follow-on OPEC/Non-OPEC Ministerial, as members of the producing cartel and non-OPEC member countries debate the fate of the production curtailment agreement in place since 2016.

    However, the biggest elephant in the room won’t even be there. The United States, while not a member of OPEC or the non-OPEC group that agreed to the cuts, has, and continues to play, an outsized role in the oil market because of both the continued strength of US shale and the actions of the Trump Administration.

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  • Nord Stream 2: Understanding the Potential Consequences

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    In a newly released report, Global Energy Center Senior Fellow Alan Riley highlights the risks that could stem from the construction of the contentious proposed Nord Stream 2 pipeline project, which would bring gas from Russia to Germany. In the report, Dr. Riley emphasizes that the proposed pipeline would have negative implications for European energy security, including undermining transit security, reducing route diversity, creating a “Straits of Hormuz” risk for Europe, and undermining the single market.

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  • Diversity of Electricity Generation in the US has Increased Not Decreased

    Resilience of the electric grid and the role of diversity of fuel sources within it have recently become hotly debated topics. In 2017, the US Department of Energy (DOE) attempted to shore up grid resilience by introducing a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) that would compensate power generators for maintaining ninety-day supply of fuel on site. The response to this proposal was split. On the one hand, proponents argued that system reliability has been undermined by ignoring long-term risks of reduced dependence on baseload sources like coal and nuclear, which can ramp up quickly, provided sufficient fuels are accessible. On the other hand, a chorus of voices from states, grid operators, and industry panned the notion as aggressive regulatory intervention in search of a problem.
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  • Livingston Quoted in The Cleveland Plain Dealer on the Impact of Changing Energy Technologies on National Defense


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  • The Irony of Italy’s Election for Energy

    The new Italian government’s declaration that it is reviewing the Trans Adriatic Pipeline (TAP) project threatens to derail a $40 billion set of projects that will bring Caspian gas to Europe and hand Russia a major victory in the process.

    What is at stake is the final leg of a complex set of projects referred to as the Southern Gas Corridor (SGC), a project intended to carry an initial 10 billion cubic meters (bcm) of Azeri gas to Italy, with the potential to double in capacity and provide gas to customers beyond Italy. Almost all the required infrastructure has already been built.

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  • Ellinas in Cyprus Mail: East Med Drilling ‘A Milestone in Turkish Energy History’


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  • Bryza Joins Real TV to Discuss Inauguration of TANAP Natural Gas Pipeline


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  • Sanctions or Self-Sabotage? The Story of Iran’s Oil Industry

    Following the lifting of international sanctions in January 2016, there was a great deal of optimism for Iran’s oil economy. Even though the global oil industry was a year into a price collapse, many companies were eager to explore investment opportunities in Iran’s neglected oil and gas assets. The National Iranian Oil Company (NIOC) and Iran’s oil ministry were also enthusiastic about revitalizing Iran’s oil and gas fields and bringing new discoveries online with the help of foreign investment and expertise. 

    However, in the nearly two and half years between the end of international sanctions and President Trump’s May 2018 decision to reinstate US sanctions, Iran accomplished...

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  • Sanctions or Self-Sabotage? The Story of Iran’s Oil Industry

    Following the lifting of international sanctions in January 2016, there was a great deal of optimism for Iran’s oil economy. Even though the global oil industry was a year into a price collapse, many companies were eager to explore investment opportunities in Iran’s neglected oil and gas assets. The National Iranian Oil Company (NIOC) and Iran’s oil ministry were also enthusiastic about revitalizing Iran’s oil and gas fields and bringing new discoveries online with the help of foreign investment and expertise.

    However, in the nearly two and half years between the end of international sanctions and President Trump’s May 2018 decision to reinstate US sanctions, Iran accomplished very little in terms of...

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  • Shaffer Quoted in Oil and Gas Journal on Europe's Energy Security


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