Event Recaps

On April 4, the Atlantic Council hosted a public event on “Big Small Companies: How Size Matters in Defense Contracting.”

Read More

On April 2, the Atlantic Council hosted Roger Krone, chairman and chief executive officer of Leidos, for a conversation on “Making a Safer, Healthier, and More Efficient World” as a part of the Atlantic Council's Captains of Industries Series.  

Read More

On March 29, the Atlantic Council hosted Commandant of the Marine Corps General Robert B. Neller for a strategic look at the US Marine Corps. The event featured a moderated discussion led by Kevin Baron, Executive Editor of Defense One.

Read More

Surfing the Strait: China, Taiwan, and Twitter
In today’s new media environment, the opportunities for instant rhetoric add a novel element to national and international discourse that can complicate relationships between countries and leaders, as with China’s recent condemnation of President Trump’s December 2017 tweet on North Korea. With the prevalence of social and digital media, anyone with an Internet connection can contribute to the international dialogue. This creates both opportunities and challenges for leaders as they work to maintain national, regional, and economic security.

Read More

On Saturday, March 17, the Atlantic Council’s sixth annual Cyber 9/12 Student Challenge in Washington, DC, concluded with the Air Force Cyber College’s “Team Fightin’ Electrons” winning first place.

The Cyber 9/12 Student Challenge is a one-of-a-kind competition designed to provide students across academic disciplines with a deeper understanding of the policy challenges associated with cyber crisis and conflict. Part interactive learning experience and part competitive scenario exercise, it challenges teams to respond to a realistic, evolving cyberattack and analyze the threat it poses to national, international, and private sector interests. The 2018 competition was held on March 16-17 at American University’s School of International Service (SIS), and featured over 150 students from fifteen states across the United States. Student teams competed to offer their best national-security policy recommendations for combating evolving fictional cyber crisis scenarios. This year’s scenario featured the risk of vulnerabilities in blockchain technologies for US national security.

Read More

A high-level Turkish government and business delegation headed by President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan recently returned from Africa after visiting Algeria, Mauritania, Senegal and Mali. This trip is the continuation of a series of visits and initiatives undertaken by Turkey as part of its official policy of “Opening to Africa” which began in 2005. As Turkey’s business interest in the continent has grown over the past decade, the Atlantic Council Turkey office hosted Dr. J. Peter Pham, Vice President for Research and Regional Initiatives and Director of the Africa Center at the Atlantic Council, for a roundtable discussion on March 19, 2018 on the opportunities and challenges presented by selected African countries in 2018 for investors as well as rules for success in this dynamic continent which presents extraordinary potential for growth but also extraordinary challenges. 

The Turkish President’s most recent trip followed his frequent visits to the continent over the past years. Since 2015, Erdogan has visited Ethiopia, Djibouti, Somalia, Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Mozambique, Madagascar, Sudan, Chad and Tunisia and since first becoming Prime Minister in 2003, Erdogan has visited a total of 23 countries 39 times. Turkey’s policy choice of engaging with Africa has resulted in the increase of the Turkey’s bilateral trade volume with the continent three-fold since 2003 to reach $18.8 billion in 2017. Trade volume with Sub-Saharan Africa stood at $6 billion in 2015 and total Turkish investment in Africa is estimated to have surpassed $6 billion. Currently, Ankara has diplomatic representation in 41 countries on the continent, an increase of 12 missions since 2009, while state-controlled Turkish Airlines now flies to 51 destinations in 33 African countries.

Read More

On March 20, 2018, the Atlantic Council’s Global Energy Center hosted Jigar Shah, Co-founder and President of Generate Capital, Inc, and Varun Sivaram, Philip D. Reed Fellow for Science and Technology at the Council on Foreign Relations, to discuss the the role of American leadership and the future of solar energy. David Livingston made opening remarks and introduced Sivaram and Shah, and Ellen Scholl moderated the discussion. Livingston and Scholl are Deputy Directors of the Global Energy Center.

Read More

On Thursday, March 15, 2018, the Atlantic Council's Global Business and Economics program hosted a lunch discussion on the EU-UK-US Trade Triangle future with Liam Fox, the UK Secretary of State for International Trade. The private event was part of the Eurogrowth initiative.

Read More


Once the country’s lifeline, Venezuela’s oil industry has been decimated, the product of decades of neglect and mismanagement. As Venezuela’s economic and humanitarian crisis worsens and political conditions deteriorate ahead of upcoming presidential elections, the Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center, in partnership with the Global Energy Center and Eurasia Center, hosted a timely conversation on March 13, 2018 on the future of Venezuela’s oil industry and the implications of the entrance of foreign actors into the space. The event marked the launch of The Collapse of the Venezuelan Oil Industry and its Global Consequences, a new policy brief by Francisco Monaldi, Atlantic Council author and fellow in Latin American Energy Policy at Rice University’s Baker Institute. The brief details what’s ahead for the crisis-ridden country and its energy industry. 

The panel discussion, moderated by Center Director Jason Marczak, convened Monaldi; David Goldwyn, chair of the Atlantic Council Energy Advisory Group and senior fellow in the Latin America Center; Rebecca Chávez, former deputy assistant secretary of defense for Western Hemisphere Affairs at the US Department of Defense; Kerry Contini, partner at Baker McKenzie’s Outbound Trade Practice Group; and David Smolansky, former mayor of El Hatillo Municipality in Venezuela and deputy secretary general of Voluntad Popular. 

Read More

Iran’s political elite is “graying” and the average age of its members exceeds 55 in the cabinet and 65 in clerical-led institutions, according to Mehrzad Boroujerdi, a professor of political science at Syracuse University and co-author of an upcoming new book, Post-Revolutionary Iran: A Handbook.

Boroujerdi, who spoke March 12 at an event hosted by the Atlantic Council’s Future of Iran initiative, said the median age in the cabinet of President Hassan Rouhani is 57 – compared to 38 in cabinets just following the 1979 Islamic revolution. The average age of members of the Guardian Council, a cleric-led body that vets all candidates for elected office, is 66 and the figure for the Assembly of Experts – clerics who nominally supervise Iran’s Supreme Leader – is 68. Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei is 78.

Read More