Aubrey Hruby

  • The Post Zuma Economic Bump will be Brief

    Since Jacob Zuma took office in May 2009, South Africa’s economy has been a story of low-to-no growth, flagrant corruption, and extreme inequality. Indeed, his erratic policies have twice spiraled the economy into recession (in 2009 and 2017), resulting in significant slashes to the country’s credit rating and an overall downgrade of the country’s brand. The recent victory of Cyril Ramaphosa at the African National Congress (ANC) conference in December injected a sense of hope into the political and economic environment.  In his proposed “new deal,” he outlined economic growth targets of 5 percent by 2023 and an initiative to create one million new jobs in an effort to reduce South Africa’s unemployment rate, which hovers stubbornly over a painfully high 26 percent. 

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  • Hruby Quoted in Daily Free Press on China's Railway Success


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  • Aubrey Hruby Testifies before the US International Trade Commission

    On Tuesday, January 23rd, Africa Center Senior Fellow Aubrey Hruby testified on US-Africa trade and investment before the US International Trade Commission hearing on US Trade and Investment with Sub-Saharan Africa: Recent Developments, #332-564.

    Distinguished members of the committee, Ambassadors, and fellow witnesses:

    I would like to begin by thanking you, not only for the opportunity to testify before you today, but also the attention that the United States International Trade Commission (USITC) has given to the topic of trade and investment with our partners across Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA).

    My name is Aubrey Hruby. I’m a Senior Fellow with the Africa Center at the Atlantic Council and I’ve spent the better part of my career advising Fortune 500 companies to design and implement successful investment and market entry strategies for over twenty African markets. I will devote my testimony to the following themes: 1) an assessment of US trade with SSA; 2) Africa’s increasing diversity of trading partners; 3) the role of the WTO’s TFA in stimulating economic growth and development on the continent; and 4) recommendations for the future.

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  • Forging a New Era in US-South African Relations

    On Tuesday, November 29, the Africa Center at the Atlantic Council launched its newest report,Forging a New Era in US-South African Relations.

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  • Hruby in Project Syndicate: The Platform Economy


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  • Addressing Africa’s Rampant Unemployment

    Africa’s rising levels of unemployment, which threaten further instability on a continent already susceptible to unrest and violent extremism, must be addressed by building capacity within the sectors of government able to instigate positive change, according to an Atlantic Council analyst.

    “The jobs issue has really concerned most companies, policy makers, stakeholders across the board because we know that without jobs you have a greater potential for unease, unrest, instability,” said Aubrey Hruby, a nonresident senior fellow with the Atlantic Council’s Africa Center.

    “The scale at which we need to create jobs in Africa is unprecedented,” she added.

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  • China and the US in Africa: Competition or Cooperation?


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  • The Jobs Gap: Making Inclusive Growth Work in Africa

    On Monday, November 6, the Africa Center at the Atlantic Council, in partnership with the Tony Blair Institute for Global Change, hosted a panel discussion on how governments and the private sector can tackle Africa’s jobs gap. The event coincided with the US launch of the Institute’s new report: The Jobs Gap: Making Inclusive Growth Work in Africa.

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  • Addressing Africa's Jobs Gap


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  • Hruby in Devex: How to Close Africa's Jobs Gap


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