David Koranyi

  • Towards 21st Century Energy Systems in Central & Eastern Europe Conference

    On June 25th, the Atlantic Council’s Global Energy Center held a half-day conference on “Towards 21st Century Energy Systems in Central & Eastern Europe,” which brought together government officials, business leaders, and experts to discuss the progression of the European Energy Union concept, the implications of the changing global liquefied natural gas (LNG) market, and the priorities of the Trump administration for Central and Eastern European energy security. It was the fourth annual edition of the conference.
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  • Croatian LNG Terminal: Now or Never?

    The planned Croatian liquified natural gas (LNG) import terminal is a critical, if yet unrealized, piece of the Central and Eastern European energy security puzzle. If constructed, the terminal would provide a gateway for LNG to reach landlocked markets in the region, thus creating competition for Russian gas and ensuring access to alternative supplies in a crisis. However, without financial support from Central and Eastern European governments, who stand to benefit the most from the proposed terminal, and concerted diplomatic engagement by Brussels and Washington it will not be realized anytime soon.    

    From a purely market perspective, the Croatian terminal is a classic case of redundant infrastructure. However, from a security of supply perspective, it is absolutely vital.

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  • Looming Conflicts over Energy Resources in the Eastern Mediterranean

    As the energy potential of the Eastern Mediterranean grows, so does the potential for conflict over resources. To reduce this potential, the United States and the European Union should play a more proactive role in defusing rising tensions in the region through two key channels of diplomacy. The United States and the European Union should reengage in Cyprus to facilitate a dedicated dialogue between the Greek and Turkish Cypriots over the development of energy resources and renew efforts to reach a settlement of the Israeli-Lebanese maritime delimitation dispute.

    The need for such engagement is even more crucial given the level of activity over the last three months.

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  • Koranyi in Foreign Policy: The Trojan Horse of Russian Gas


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  • Koranyi Quoted in Cyprus Mail on US Energy Policies Under President Trump


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  • Koranyi Quoted by Axios on Trump’s Push for Natural Gas Exports


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  • Energy Security in Central & Eastern Europe: New Challenges and Opportunities Conference

    On June 7th, the Energy Diplomacy Initiative within the Atlantic Council’s Global Energy Center held a half-day conference on Energy Security in Central & Eastern Europe: New Challenges and Opportunities, which brought together government officials, business leaders, and experts to discuss the implications of the changing global LNG market, progression of the European Energy Union concept, and the priorities of the new US administration for Central and Eastern European energy security.


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  • Trump's 'Huge Mistake'

    US President Donald J. Trump’s decision to take the United States out of a global agreement that seeks to limit the damage caused by climate change is “shortsighted and reckless,” a “huge mistake,” and cedes US energy leadership to China and Europe, according to Atlantic Council analysts.

    “The president’s decision to withdraw from Paris is a huge mistake. There is no upside,” said Richard Morningstar, founding director and chairman of the Atlantic Council’s Global Energy Center. 

    “This decision will make it more difficult to work with our friends and allies on a whole host of critical foreign policy and national security issues. It will make it more difficult for our companies to work in many countries,” he added.

    Trump announced his decision at the White House on June 1.

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  • Making the Three Seas Initiative a Priority for Trump

    In light of Russia’s use of energy as a weapon in Europe, the Three Seas Initiative—a project designed to unite the region of Europe between the Baltic, Adriatic, and Black Seas through energy infrastructure—should be a strategic priority for the new US administration, retired Marine Corps Gen. James L. Jones, chairman of the Atlantic Council’s Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security, said at the Council’s Istanbul Summit on April 28.

    “This is a truly transatlantic project that has enormous geopolitical, geostrategic, and geo-economic ramifications,” said Jones, who served as national security advisor in the Obama administration. Consequently, he contended, “we need to cultivate the new American administration’s interest.” By strengthening the Three Seas region, and by extension all of Europe, the initiative will strengthen the entire transatlantic community, he said.

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  • Koranyi Joins Sky News Arabia to Discuss the Global Energy Forum


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