Jason Marczak

  • Led by Leftists Since 2003, Brazil Could Soon Get a Far-Right President

    Jair Bolsonaro, a far-right populist who has been compared to Donald J. Trump, won the first round of the presidential election in Brazil on October 7, but fell just short of the majority required to avoid a second-round runoff. The former army captain will face left-wing Workers’ Party (PT) candidate, Fernando Haddad, in a runoff on October 28.

    Bolsonaro belongs to the Social Liberal Party (PSL). He has a history of making incendiary remarks about women, minorities, and gays; he has also promised to get tough on crime and corruption. He won just under 47 percent of the vote, his closest competitor, Haddad, got 28 percent.

    “Bolsonaro’s near victory in the first round shows Brazilians are fed up with insecurity and corruption, and desperately want their economic fortunes reversed,” said Jason Marczak, director of the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center.

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  • Marczak in the Hill: New NAFTA's Most Crucial Bits are the Holdovers From Old NAFTA


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  • Marczak Op-Ed in The Hill on New NAFTA Deal


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  • Marczak Quoted in El Financiero Bloomberg on NAFTA


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  • Meet the New NAFTA: The United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement

    Canada agreed, moments before the clock ran out on a September 30 deadline, to sign on to a trade agreement between the United States and Mexico that would replace the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The new agreement will be known as the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement or USMCA.

    US President Donald J. Trump announced the deal at the White House on October 1 describing it as a “brand new deal to terminate and replace NAFTA.” With this breakthrough, Trump has fulfilled his campaign promise to rewrite NAFTA, which he has called “the worst trade deal in history.” The new agreement was negotiated “on the principle of fairness and reciprocity,” said Trump.

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  • Trump Puts America First at the United Nations

    US President Donald J. Trump on September 25 used his second address to the United Nations General Assembly to reaffirm his commitment to an America First approach to foreign policy.

    “America will always choose independence and cooperation over global governance, control, and domination,” Trump told the gathering of world leaders at the opening of the 73rd session of the United Nations General Assembly in New York. He laid out his vision for US foreign policy, with an emphasis on protecting US sovereignty from global governance and rising globalization.

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  • NAFTA: The End?

    Now that the United States and Mexico have reached a bilateral trade agreement, the focus shifts to Canada—the third partner in the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

    “Reaching a US-Mexico trade deal is critical for the US and Mexican economies and for the millions of US workers who depend on trade with our southern neighbor. But it would be a real loss to not incorporate Canada—the number one destination of US exports,” said Jason Marczak, director of the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center.

    “Across the United States, communities depend on US-Mexico trade and also a smooth functioning trilateral accord,” he added.

    NAFTA, which was signed in 1993, however, may well be entering its final days.

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  • Marczak Quoted in VOA on Mattis South America Tour


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  • Marczak Quoted in Fox News on Alleged Attack on Nicolas Maduro


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  • Marczak Quoted in The Wall Street Journal on Assassination Attempt of Nicolás Maduro


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