Mirette Mabrouk

  • The President’s Scorecard

    Egyptians are going to the polls to vote in a presidential election for the third time since the uprisings of 2011. The act of voting for a president who could, ostensibly, be voted out was a novelty. Hosni Mubarak served five six-year terms before stepping down in February of 2011, and Egyptians were keen on taking advantage of their new rights. This election, however, is likely to see a low turnout at the polls. 

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  • The President’s Scorecard

    Egyptians are going to the polls to vote in a presidential election for the third time since the uprisings of 2011. The act of voting for a president who could, ostensibly, be voted out was a novelty. Hosni Mubarak served five six-year terms before stepping down in February of 2011, and Egyptians were keen on taking advantage of their new rights. This election, however, is likely to see a low turnout at the polls.

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  • Mabrouk in The Hill: Trump Letting Campaign Promises Dictate Israeli Embassy Decision


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  • Mabrouk Quoted by Enterprise on US-Egypt Relations


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  • Raising the Stakes: Egyptians Have Questions About a New Emergency Law and the State of Security

    The dead were buried without a mass.

    On April 9, two suicide bombers hit two churches in the cities of Tanta and Alexandria in Egypt. The next day, the first burial was held for seven of those killed at St Mina Monastery in King Mariout, on the outskirts of Alexandria. The Eastern Orthodox Church does not hold public funeral masses during Holy Week before Easter, so hundreds of mourners attended a funeral and burial without the standard mass service. Some of them had been there before—St Mina is where those who were killed in the blast at Two Saints Church in Alexandria in 2011 lie.

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  • Mabrouk Quoted by the Christian Science Monitor on Egypt's State of Emergency


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  • In Egypt, Watch this (Shrinking) Space

    President’s plan for state of emergency could further reduce space for dissent, said Atlantic Council’s Mirette Mabrouk

    Egyptian President Abdul Fattah el-Sisi’s decision to impose a three-month state of emergency in response to deadly church bombings will likely further shrink the space for freedom of expression and dissent in Egypt, according to Mirette Mabrouk, director of research and programs at the Atlantic Council’s Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East.

    “The space for freedom of expression and dissent in Egypt has already shrunk considerably. I can’t imagine that this is to going help,” said Mabrouk. The state of emergency, which must first be approved by parliament, would allow security forces to monitor people's social media and communications without permission, but after the president has issued a verbal or written order.

    Sisi’s relationship with the United States grew frosty on US President Barack Obama’s watch amid concerns in Washington about the military coup that brought Sisi, then a general, to power on July 3, 2013, and the bloody crackdown that followed on August 14, 2013, which killed an estimated 817 peaceful demonstrators in Cairo’s Rabaa al-Adawiya Square.

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  • Brexit’s Impact on UK Development and Foreign Policy in the Middle East

    As financial markets try to regain their footing in the wake of the United Kingdom’s vote to leave the European Union (or “Brexit”), many wonder the effect the reverberations might have on the politics and economics of other parts of the world. For the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), this divorce-between-nations could potentially have a serious impact on development and foreign assistance to the region.
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  • Pavel and Mabrouk Join CBC Arabic to Discuss Egypt and the Middle East


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  • Mabrouk on the Sisi Administration

    Rafik Hariri Center Deputy Director Mirette Mabrouk joins BBC to discuss the policies of President Sisi in Sinai:

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