Tarek Radwan

  • Winning Yemen, but at What Price?

    The Hudayda (also spelled Hodeida) port receives about 70 percent of all imports and humanitarian assistance shipments to the poorest country in the Middle East, wracked by decades of on-and-off conflict and standing at the precipice of famine thanks to the most recent conflict between the rebels and those backing President Abdrabbo Mansour Hadi, including the Saudi Arabia-led Coalition. It also constitutes one the last remaining portals to the outside world through which the Houthi rebels and their allies—tied to former disgraced president Ali Abdullah Saleh—receive weapons, ammunition, and financing.

    Read More
  • Radwan in the Hill: Yemen Raid and Airstrikes Put 'Forgotten War' Back in the Spotlight


    Read More
  • Rethinking Transitional Justice in Yemen

    Six years ago today, the Yemeni people erupted in a Day of Rage against a corrupt regime to demand equal rights, but the transitional process faltered leading to the now nearly two-year-old conflict between Houthi rebels allied with former president Ali Abdullah Saleh and the government-in-exile led by President Abdrabbo Mansour Hadi backed by Saudi Arabia. Continuing clashes have delivered a brutal humanitarian crisis, an economy on the verge of collapse, and over 10,000 Yemeni deaths according to UN figures. It may seem antithetical to discuss issues of transitional justice while Yemen struggles with an ongoing war, but the conflict is slowly creeping toward an inevitable stalemate.
    Read More
  • Yemen Heightens Tension in Saudi’s International Relations

    The relationship between the United States and Saudi Arabia has witnessed considerable strain over the past few years, but increasing reports documenting poor targeting practices and disproportionate collateral damage in the Saudi-led coalition’s conduct of the war in Yemen has sparked an unprecedented outcry in the US Congress.
    Read More
  • Brexit’s Impact on UK Development and Foreign Policy in the Middle East

    As financial markets try to regain their footing in the wake of the United Kingdom’s vote to leave the European Union (or “Brexit”), many wonder the effect the reverberations might have on the politics and economics of other parts of the world. For the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), this divorce-between-nations could potentially have a serious impact on development and foreign assistance to the region.
    Read More
  • Joint Arab Military Force: A Force for Stability?

    The heads of Arab League countries agreed at a summit in Egypt last month to set up a joint military force.

    Tarek Radwan, an Associate Director for the Atlantic Council’s Rafik Hariri Center and editor of the MENASource blog, interviewed Atlantic Council analysts who weighed in on these plans.

    Read More
  • The Joint Arab Military Force and Yemen: Stability or Sectarianism?

    The conclusion of the Arab League Summit on March 30, 2015 culminated in a grand statement announcing the formation of a joint Arab military force to tackle regional challenges from the Maghreb to Yemen. While significant, particularly given the ongoing military operations and ground force mobilization led by Saudi Arabia against the Houthis in Yemen, the formation of a unified force has long preoccupied the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries in an effort to shore up their own security. Could this announcement herald a new source of stability in a volatile region?
    Read More
  • The Libya Conundrum

    What is happening in Libya? And how will Egypt react? Libya today has devolved into a violent political struggle between two major blocs: the internationally recognized, Tobruk-based parliament versus Tripoli’s parliament and administration.
    Read More
  • Mezran and Radwan: The Libya Conundrum

    Rafik Hariri Center Senior Fellow Karim Mezran and Associate Director Tarek Radwan cowrite for The Cairo Review of Global Affairs on Egypt's reaction to Libya's political struggle:

    Read More
  • Radwan on Dropped Charges Against Former Egyptian President

    Al Jazeera America quotes Rafik Hariri Center Associate Director Tarek Radwan on what the dropped charges against former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak mean for the Arab Spring: 

    Read More