Reports

The current NATO command structure is insufficient to manage the individually formidable tasks of changing doctrine; out of area operations; emerging and unpredictable threats and asymmetric strategies; cleaner “supported-supporting” command relationships; integration of joint forces; and making the transition from threat-based to capabilities-based force development simultaneously.

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This compendium presents the texts of the U.S. policy statements, laws, and regulations (or relevant parts thereof) that govern U.S. relations with Libya, on both the bilateral and multilateral levels. Before each document or group of documents is an analytic summary which highlights the context, major provisions, and significance of the policy, law, or regulation in question as it relates to U.S.-Libyan relations. At the end is an essay entitled, “Removing Restrictions on U.S.-Libyan Relations,” which discusses how a U.S. government seeking to do so might go about the process of normalizing relations, taking either a comprehensive or incremental approach.

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Few aspects of the process of democratization in the countries of Central and Eastern Europe are more important than the liberalization of the media. Unless free and independent media can be established on a sound financial footing, the new democratic institutions will be seriously incomplete. This study provides a survey of the experience of the media reform to date, an assessment of the challenges that must still be faced, and conclusions and recommendations on what is needed to bring the process to a successful conclusion in the light of Western experience.

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The Atlantic Council asked General Michael Carns, USAF (Ret.), Dr. Jacques Gansler, and Walter B. Slocomb to visit Asia to conduct in-depth discussions with political, military, and business leaders on all aspects of missile defense, including threat assessments, strategic implications, and the likely consequences of missile defense developments for the future security environment and the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction.  After meetings in Beijing, New Delhi, Seoul, Taipei, and Tokyo, they released this report.

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This report discusses the future of US-Libyan relations. It states that the set of laws and regulations that govern US relations with Libya are outdated and recommends the countering of international terrorism as a principal objective for a new strategy. The authors suggest pursuing secondary objectives, such as energy security, containment of Libya's regional ambitions, development of economic relations and fostering of human rights and political reform in Libya. They conclude that in pursuing opportunities to advance its objectives, the US should focus on areas where it coincides with Libyan and European interests.

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The Chinese defense industrial complex (CDIC) can be looked at as a remarkable accomplishment, a worst-case example of Chinese state-owned enterprises and a strategic failure. When the People’s Republic of China was established in 1949, its economy and industrial base was an ash heap, yet within 20 years the CDIC was producing a full range of relatively modern military equipment, including strategic weapons. But the sector did not keep pace with modernization, and today is regarded as an industrial dinosaur, unable to achieve that most meaningful metric in this era of economic reform: profitability. More importantly, the CDIC has not been able to design and produce the systems the Chinese military deems necessary for its future—with the result that China has become dependent on foreign sources for key technologies and weapons system.

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The papers in this compendium were prepared for a conference in October 2002 designed to illuminate European perspectives on the growing transatlantic military capabilities gap and on how this gap might be bridged. The conference was organized into four panels: the first focused broadly on capabilities, the second on “Spending More Wisely” initiatives, the third on obstacles to closing the gap, and the fourth on the role of defense industry.

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The papers in this compendium were prepared for a conference in October 2002 designed to illuminate European perspectives on the growing transatlantic military capabilities gap and on how this gap might be bridged. The conference was organized into four panels: the first focused broadly on capabilities, the second on “Spending More Wisely” initiatives, the third on obstacles to closing the gap, and the fourth on the role of defense industry.

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This policy paper addresses difference in US-EU regulatory policy in connection with food safety and the environment. The authors examine current trans-Atlantic tensions arising out of several areas of domestic regulations on issues surrounding food safety and environmental protection.

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This paper examines the trans-Atlantic relations between the US, the EU and Russia. The authors analyze the process of cooperation between Russia and the West and discuss the process of the country's inclusion into the western economy and security institutions. The paper focuses on three main areas: integration of Russia into the trans-Atlantic and global economies; building of a new Euro-Atlantic security system and responding to new global challenges.

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