Denmark

  • An EU Navy Is Impossible; Fortunately, It’s Not Necessary.

    To rebuild robust naval forces, Europeans should think less like Americans, and more like Russians.

    As I noted yesterday, Brexit has opened all sorts of talk about the future of British and European military activities. To continue the argument today, let’s tack towards naval matters. In “All the Queen's Ships” (Proceedings of the US Naval Institute, January 2017), James C. Bennett of the Economic Policy Centre in London recommended formation of a Union Navy, loosely composed of the Royal, Royal Canadian, Royal Australian, and Royal New Zealand Navies, under their single sovereign. As one might expect in his argument, “the four main Westminster democracies” could afford greater military capabilities together than separately. To an American, this might seem another brilliant idea that our allies will never get on with. But if practically speaking, discussing this is a waste of oxygen, then just how silly is talking about forming a single European Navy from the polyglot members of the European Union? To the contrary, Europeans can get on with rebuilding robust naval forces as a continent of equals—just by thinking less like Americans, and more like Russians.

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  • Brexit Puts European Security Cooperation at Risk

    Brussels is calling Theresa May’s bluff on security.
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  • Denmark: Russia Hacked Our Defense Ministry for Two Years

    From Reuters: Russia has hacked the Danish Defense and gained access to employees' emails in 2015 and 2016
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  • Danish Intelligence Report Warns NATO Members of New Russian Cyberattacks

    Russia has the willingness and capacity to launch serial cyberattacks against Denmark and any neighboring Nordic or Baltic state
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  • Russian Leader Makes Nuclear Threat to Norway for Hosting US Marines

    A key Russian defence figure says the deployment of US Marines at Værnes is part of a US buildup to go on a "global blitz" and warned that Norway may make itself a target for a potential nuclear attack.
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  • The United States Must Be the World’s Policeman

    Barely had I been seated before Vladimir Putin told me that NATO—the organization that I then headed—no longer had any purpose and should be disbanded.
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  • Russia's Ambitions in the Atlantic

    [A]s Russia ramps up its military presencein the North Atlantic, NATO’s presence has atrophied.
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  • Danish Team Removes 500 Tons of Chemical Weapons From Libya

    From the AP:  A Danish-led international operation to rid Libya of its chemical weapons has removed 500 tons of chemicals from the North African country, Denmark said Wednesday.
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  • NATO Summit Special Series: Denmark and Norway

    The two Scandinavian allies strongly supported the outcome of the last NATO Summit in Wales, with a renewed focus on deterrence and reassurance measures to counter Russian aggression in the Baltic Sea region.
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  • ‘Competitiveness Heavily Depends Upon Price’

    The Danish fighter jet procurement decision requires further explanation.  

    Up front, the Danish Ministry of Defense seemed to have done it all right. In choosing a replacement for the Royal Danish Air Force’s F-16s, the ministry received bids from Eurofighter for the Typhoon, Boeing for the F-18E and -F Super Hornet, and Lockheed Martin for the F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter. The members of the selection team set baseline requirements and trade-off criteria in strategic, military, economic, and industrial respects. They hired Deloitte, RAND, Qinetic, and local firm Vorderman Consulting to build formal models addressing costs, capabilities, risks, and industrial benefits. The resulting figures, however, were wholly unexpected. The Danish MoD should provide some further explanation, and not just to the Danish people and parliament. For a transparent outcome to this process may matter in North America as well.

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