Italy

  • Moscow’s Eye Turns South

    In November 2016, the Atlantic Council published the first volume of The Kremlin’s Trojan Horses, detailing the extent of Russian-linked political networks in France, Germany, and the United Kingdom. That report has since become a guide to those seeking to understand how the Kremlin cultivates political allies in Western European countries in order to undermine European consensus and sow divisions. In a new report, The Kremlin’s Trojan Horses 2.0, we trace the extent of Russian political penetration in Europe’s southern flank—Greece, Italy, and Spain.

    These countries bore the brunt of Europe’s major crises in the last decade: the 2008 economic crisis and the 2015 refugee crisis. In the aftermath of the economic crisis, Greece, Italy, and Spain experienced double digit unemployment and income drops, coupled with reductions to social safety nets. The EU’s response was to impose austerity measures. And while these policies helped shore up the countries’ economies, they also bred domestic resentment against the EU, mainstream parties, and liberal democracy. Then Syrian refugees began arriving by the thousands on the Italian and Greek shores, further exacerbating social tensions.

    It is this volatile climate that has proven to be fertile ground for Russian overtures, while providing an opening for political parties oriented toward the East.

    Read More
  • TRADE IN ACTION September 21, 2017


    THIS WEEK IN TRADE
    Today, September 21, the Comprehensive Economic and Trade Agreement (CETA) between the EU and Canada provisionally enters into force. It has been eight years since the start of negotiations and all chapters, except for the Investment Court System, are entering into force. What next? CETA needs to pass 42 national and regional parliaments in 28 EU countries. So far only six countries have finalized the ratification (read more on Politico). 

    Read More
  • An EU Navy Is Impossible; Fortunately, It’s Not Necessary.

    To rebuild robust naval forces, Europeans should think less like Americans, and more like Russians.

    As I noted yesterday, Brexit has opened all sorts of talk about the future of British and European military activities. To continue the argument today, let’s tack towards naval matters. In “All the Queen's Ships” (Proceedings of the US Naval Institute, January 2017), James C. Bennett of the Economic Policy Centre in London recommended formation of a Union Navy, loosely composed of the Royal, Royal Canadian, Royal Australian, and Royal New Zealand Navies, under their single sovereign. As one might expect in his argument, “the four main Westminster democracies” could afford greater military capabilities together than separately. To an American, this might seem another brilliant idea that our allies will never get on with. But if practically speaking, discussing this is a waste of oxygen, then just how silly is talking about forming a single European Navy from the polyglot members of the European Union? To the contrary, Europeans can get on with rebuilding robust naval forces as a continent of equals—just by thinking less like Americans, and more like Russians.

    Read More
  • Braw Joins RAI to Discuss Italian Armed Forces Foreign Operations


    Read More
  • Braw Joins RAI to Discuss the Italian Armed Forces


    Read More
  • Braw in Politico: Europe's Military Maestros: Italy


    Read More
  • Ellinas in in-Cyprus: Italy’s energy strategy


    Read More
  • Montanino Joins CGTN to Discuss Italy’s Economy


    Read More
  • Trump Believes 'Nobody Ever Criticized NATO'

    TRUMP: They had a quote from me that NATO’s obsolete. But they didn’t say why it was obsolete.
    Read More
  • Trump Praises Italy’s Fight Against Terrorism And Pushes Gentiloni on Defense Spending

    PRESIDENT TRUMP:  Italy is also a key partner in the fight against terrorism.
    Read More