After three decades, Sudan is no longer ruled by Omar al-Bashir, but his ouster in a military coup raises more questions than answers.


Amid anti-government protests that have only grown in intensity, Sudanese Defense Minister Awad Ibn Auf on April 11 announced that Bashir had been taken into custody and that a transitional government administered by the military and led by Auf would run Sudan for a two-year period. Auf also announced the suspension of the constitution and a three-month state of emergency.

“A military interim government for two years may not be what the protesters wanted,” said Mary C. Yates, an Atlantic Council board director who served as special assistant to US President Barack Obama and senior director for African affairs at the National Security Council.

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At last we know something. The United Kingdom will not be crashing out of the European Union on April 12 and it will take part in the European elections on May 23. But that’s about the extent of our knowledge. We still do not know how, or when, or even whether, Britain will make its exit from the EU.  Nor can we be sure that anyone elected to the European Parliament in May will actually take their seats when the new Parliament opens for business on July 2.

Those are the main conclusions from the European Summit that ended in Brussels in the early hours of April 11. Officially, the UK was given until October 31 to get its act together or, in Brussels-speak, to gain an extension to the Article 50 process under which it is supposedly quitting the EU.

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Bleary-eyed Israelis woke on the morning after Israel’s April 9 election to greater clarity about their immediate political future. Having gone to sleep on the evening of the ballot with exit polls forecasting — albeit, inconclusively — a dead heat between the two anchor parties (Likud and Blue-White) and their respective ideological blocs, Israelis now face the likely prospect of a fifth Netanyahu government.

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Both sides decide ‘there should not be forced transfer of technology’

The European Union and China on April 9 agreed to strengthen their trade relationship, cooperate on WTO reform, widen market access, and not force businesses to hand over their intellectual property— the last a longstanding complaint of foreign investors in China.

The announcement followed a meeting between European Council President Donald Tusk, European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker, and Chinese Prime Minister Li Keqiang in Brussels.

“We managed to agree a joint statement which sets the direction for our partnership based on reciprocity,” Tusk said.

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The diversity of financial institutions, with their differences in business models, liability structures, time horizons, and investment motivations could contribute greatly to financial resilience. Since the 2008 crisis, financial institutional diversity has helped sustain market liquidity while banks have curtailed their market-making activity [a readiness to buy and sell securities to accommodate their clients] due to regulatory changes and business strategies. Improving resiliency and liquidity in financial markets is critical to better finance the real economy, allocate risks properly, and support financial stability.

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The Álvaro de Bazán-class Aegis frigate SPS Méndez Núñez (F-104) steaming alongside one of our most lethal and capable naval assets, USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72), is a sight to behold. For a better part of the past year, Méndez Núñez and its crew, led by Capt. Antonio Gonzalez del Tanago de la Lastra, have integrated into the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, and will continue to operate as one of Lincoln’s escorts during its around-the-world deployment, which is currently underway. This is a powerful display of how integrated the United States is with its NATO allies, including la Armada Española, the Spanish Navy.

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On a visit to Tbilisi in March, NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg reiterated a decade-old promise: Georgia will eventually join the Western military alliance. However, despite Stoltenberg’s comments, there is little discernible evidence to suggest membership for Georgia is in the cards.

At NATO’s Bucharest Summit in 2008, the Alliance welcomed the transatlantic aspirations of Georgia and Ukraine and agreed that both countries will eventually become members of NATO. Since then, Georgia has taken meaningful political, economic, and military steps westward.

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“I love Israel,” Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro declared in Hebrew as he kicked off his charm offensive on a four-day visit to Israel on March 31. His trip, days prior to the country’s April 9 general election, aimed to offer an important boost to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s election prospects.


In the midst of a tough — not to mention dirty — reelection campaign, Netanyahu has emphasized his foreign policy acumen, an area in which his main competition, Kahol Lavan chief Benny Gantz, has less experience.

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The worsening security situation in Libya, where forces loyal to the leader of the self-styled Libyan National Army are attempting to seize the capital city, could make conditions even more dire for migrants in the country, the European Union’s Commissioner for Migration, Home Affairs, and Citizenship Dimitris Avramopoulos said at the Atlantic Council in Washington on April 8.

Libya is a main conduit used by traffickers to funnel migrants north onto Europe. Avramopoulos admitted that the conditions in migrant detention centers in the country, which drew international attention when a Somali man burned himself to death in November, are “a disgrace for the whole world.”

“No one wants this. Not the European Union, not the international community, and certainly not the migrants who end up there,” said Avramopoulos. He maintained that the EU is “doing everything we can to assist or evacuate people stuck there, but most importantly to avoid them ever being there in the first place.”

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The first major showdown of our new era of great power competition, unfolding with accelerating speed over the past ten weeks in Venezuela, has entered a dangerous new phase. That is true, most of all, for the Venezuelan people, but also for Latin American democracies and for vital US interests in the Western Hemisphere.

How this drama turns out may mark the most significant test yet of the Trump administration's credibility, following a highest-level chorus this week of President Donald Trump, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and National Security Advisor John Bolton, who all declared – in one way or another – that Russia had to get out of the country.

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