For years the debate has raged within and outside the US military on whether the US should focus on this war or the next big fight. The “this war” crowd argues that not only does the US need to focus on the current warfighting requirements, but that the future security scenarios will consist of the US being engaged in nation-building and stabilization operations for decades to come. The "next war" fans usually argue that while the current fights are certainly important, one should not forget that near peer competitors can rise fast, and that if America lost its conventional military edge that in itself would be another enticement for foreign nations to challenge the US militarily.

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The saying went something like this: After we sort out Kosovo's independence, the rest of the Balkans' transition and accession to the European Union will be routine procedure. But now there is a new hurdle in the road, and it's a high one: Bosnia.

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NATO's 60th Anniversary Summit ended with a cheerful photo-op and a pleased President Obama.  America’s NATO allies have pledged 5,000 more troops for Afghanistan and a lot of cash.  But is this a real contribution to bolstering the alliance or simply a vocal display of camaraderie?

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Bob Gates Budget Press Conference Photo

U.S. defense secretary Robert Gates has proposed a budget that would radically overhaul the Pentagon's spending priorities, cutting or eliminating several major weapons systems in order to field more ground troops and better fight counterinsurgency missions.  Congress will likely temper these changes.

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If the world economy is in crisis, the market economy is even more in crisis. It is seen as unfair, having generated unacceptable inequalities; and inefficient, having attracted massive resources into financial activities whose contribution to the economy is questioned. Yet the world needs an integrated market economy, a necessary, though not sufficient, condition for growth and welfare.

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The White House is touting President Obama's visit to Turkey as the cure-all that will not only put US-Turkey relations back on track, but help to resolve some of Europe's energy security concerns.

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The recent spate of activity in U.S.-Russian relations is fundamentally about the whether the United States ought to be hedging against future Russian hostility. 

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Presidents Barack Obama and Dmitry Medvedev had a cordial meeting last week. No major breakthroughs occurred, but both men indicated that they could do business together. That’s not going to be enough.

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President Obama’s trip to Europe generated many headlines. By combining the G-20 meeting with a NATO summit and routine bilateral discussions, very few international security issues were left untouched. Among those is nuclear disarmament. In Prague, President Obama declared, "The United States will take concrete steps toward a world without nuclear weapons.”  

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As long anticipated, North Korea test fired a Taepodong rocket hours ago, which President Obama termed "a threat to the northeast Asian region and to international peace and security."  Is that really so? Don Snow published the following analysis yesterday afternoon, viewing the test prospectively.

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