2018 Elections

  • INFOGRAPHICS - Disinformation in Democracies: Strengthening Digital Resilience in Latin America

    2018 saw political tides turn in three of Latin America’s largest democracies. These elections also saw deep polarization and distrust in institutions among Brazilians, Mexicans, and Colombians in an information environment ripe with disinformation. And while disinformation and misinformation are nothing new, the spread of false information at alarming rates is more effective and worrisome than ever. A year-long effort to identify, expose, and explain disinformation around elections in Latin America using open source methodologies yielded the following key findings and recommendations.


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  • Digital Resilience in Latin America: Automation, Disinformation, and Polarization in Elections

    2018 saw political tides turn in three of Latin America’s largest democracies. These elections also saw deep polarization and distrust in institutions among Brazilians, Mexicans, and Colombians in an information environment ripe with disinformation. Following a year-long effort in which the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center and its Digital Forensic Research Lab (DFRLab) exposed and explained disinformation around key elections in Brazil, Colombia, and Mexico, on Thursday, March 28, 2019, the teams launched a comprehensive report that outlines trends and lessons learned from the 2018 presidential elections in Latin America.


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  • #ElectionWatch: Likes from Afar in Oaxaca

    Inauthentic activity originating from South Asian Facebook accounts artificially inflated the number of Facebook “likes” on social media content for and about the Government of the State of Oaxaca in México. The main beneficiary of the seemingly inauthentic activity is Alejandro Murat Hinojosa, Governor of the State of Oaxaca, in southern Mexico. Similar reactions can be seen on his official state government page and the Guelaguetza page — an account intended to promote the Guelaguetza festival, an annual traditional indigenous festival celebrated in the City of Oaxaca every July.

    Read the full analysis on Medium.

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  • #ElectionWatch: Cuentas de Asia que dan likes al gobierno de Oaxaca

    Un número inusual de cuentas provenientes del sureste asiático están reaccionando a publicaciones hechas en las páginas oficiales de Facebook de autoridades e instituciones mexicanas. El principal beneficiario de esta actividad aparentemente inauténtica es Alejandro Murat Hinojosa, gobernador del estado de Oaxaca en el sur de México. Estas reacciones sospechosas se pueden encontrar en la página oficial de Murat del gobierno estatal y en la página de Guelaguetza, creada para promover el festival tradicional indígena de Guelaguetza, que se celebra en la ciudad de Oaxaca cada mes de julio.

    Read the full analysis on FGV.

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  • SPOTLIGHT: Brazil's Anti-Corruption Fight: What Lies Ahead?

    On October 28, Brazilians elected Jair Messias Bolsonaro as the next president of the republic, following a hyper-polarized and contentious election. The impetus, in part, for the frustration: Brazilians’ anger with rampant corruption.

    In this Spotlight, we ask: What are the five most important areas Brazil’s new administration must focus on to effectively fight corruption?


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  • Jair Bolsonaro's First One Hundred Days

    Read the Interactive Report

    In this Spotlight, we ask: What are the four of the top action items President Bolsonaro might prioritize in his first one hundred days in office.


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  • SPOTLIGHT: Jair Bolsonaro's First One Hundred Days

    In one of the most consequential presidential elections in the country’s recent history, Brazilians elected Jair Messias Bolsonaro their next president on October 28, 2018, after two highly contested rounds of voting that left Brazilians deeply divided.

    In this Spotlight, we ask: What are four of the top issues President Jair Bolsonaro might prioritize in his first one hundred days in office?


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  • #ElectionWatch: Partisan Debate and Electoral Violence in Brazil

    On October 7, a few hours after the polls closed in Brazil and a runoff between the far-right candidate Jair Bolsonaro and leftist Fernando Haddad was announced, capoeira master Moa do Katende was stabbed to death in a bar.

    The murder received extensive attention because it was reported as an example of the increasing electoral violence in the country. The victim was a Worker’s Party (PT) supporter, while the suspect was an alleged Bolsonaro supporter.

    Read the full analysis on Medium.

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  • Brazil's Vote: The Role of Disinformation in the 2018 Elections

    Days after the first round of voting in the Brazilian election, the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center and Digital Forensic Research Lab (DFRLab) hosted the conference call “Brazil's Vote: The Role of Disinformation in the 2018 Elections”todiscuss the impact of disinformation and misinformation on Sunday’s results.

    The Atlantic Council’s #ElectionWatch Latin America initiative has identified, exposed, and explained disinformation and the spread of misinformation in this year’s elections in Colombia, Mexico, and Brazil. In Brazil, findings reveal that disinformation and misinformation circulated across Latin America's biggest democracy as voters headed to the polls in an extremely polarized environment.

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  • Brazilian Elections: Results and Expectations

    On Tuesday, October 9, only two days after the first round of voting in Brazil, the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America, the Brazil-US Business Council, and the Brazil Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars hosted the conference call “Brazilian Elections: Results and Expectations” to discuss the impact of the outcomes ahead of second-round voting on October 28. 

    Paulo Sotero, director of the Brazil Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, kicked off the call with opening remarks, and Renata Vasconcellos, senior director of the Brazil-US Business Council, moderated the discussion between Ricardo Sennes, nonresident senior fellow at the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center, and Monica de Bolle, director of the Latin American Studies and Emerging Markets Department at Johns Hopkins University (SAIS).

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