Bart Oosterveld

  • Beijing Strikes Back with More US Tariffs

    China’s commerce ministry announced on August 23 that it would be imposing additional tariffs on $75 billion of US goods in retaliation for the tariffs unveiled by US President Donald J. Trump on August 1.

    The Chinese decision would see tariff increases of 5 to 10 percent on 5,078 US products including soybeans and crude oil. The changes are scheduled to take effect in line with Trump’s August tariffs on September 1 and December 15. On August 1, Trump announced new tariffs on previously unaffected Chinese goods totaling $300 billion, meaning that virtually all Chinese goods shipped to the United States would be hit by US tariffs.


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  • Washington Brands Beijing a Currency Manipulator as Trade Tensions Mount

    While the US Treasury Department’s August 5 decision to label China a “currency manipulator,” is “largely symbolic,” it could be a sign of “more aggressive countermeasures,” between the two countries as they struggle to reach an agreement on their trading relationship, according to Bart Oosterveld, director of the Atlantic Council’s Global Business and Economics Program and C. Boyden Gray fellow on global finance and growth.


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  • Trump Announces More Tariffs to Put Pressure on Beijing

    US President Donald J. Trump escalated his growing trade dispute with China on August 1, announcing that the United States would place additional tariffs of 10 percent on the so far un-tariffed $300 billion dollars’ worth of Chinese goods, effective September 1. These tariffs will be added to the 25 percent tariffs already on $250 billion dollars of goods, meaning that nearly all Chinese exports to the United States could be facing tariffs.


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  • Libra: Balancing Risks and Opportunities

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    Facebook has disclosed its plans to launch the ambitious new digital currency, Libra, in the first half of 2020. Operating on a version of blockchain, Libra hopes to become a widely adopted payment method, supported by Facebook's 2.4 bn users and a coalition of global corporations including Uber, Visa, and Spotify that form the Libra Association.


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  • Can Xi and Trump Pause their Trade War in Osaka?

    US President Donald J. Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping may agree to a temporary ceasefire in their ongoing trade war when they meet in Osaka, Japan, on June 29, but a full trade deal is unlikely, according to Bart Oosterveld, C. Boyden Gray fellow on global finance and growth and director of the Atlantic Council’s Global Business and Economics Program.


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  • What is Wrong with the WTO?

    Coming up on the anniversary of the July 2018 “trade truce” between European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker and US President Donald J. Trump, little progress has been made in trade negotiations between the United States and the European Union. This article is the third in a series that will take stock of the opportunities in and challenges to the deepest trading relationship in the world and focuses on WTO reform.

    The World Trade Organization (WTO), the largest multilateral trade organization and the foundation of the global trading system, has increasingly drawn the ire of the United States and other countries that view the organization as outdated and complacent as other countries skirt the rules to get ahead.


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  • Transatlantic Ties After the EU Elections: Prospects for Transatlantic Cooperation in Trade and Sanctions


    On June 10, the Atlantic Council’s Global Business & Economics Program’s and Future Europe Initiative hosted a roundtable discussion on the current state and the future of transatlantic ties featuring Caroline Vicini, Deputy Head of the EU Delegation to the United States. The event also served as a farewell to Ms. Vicini, who after several years of distinguished leadership in her current position will be soon leaving Washington, DC.

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  • Washington’s WTO Frustrations a Key Stumbling Block in Transatlantic Trade Ties

    Coming up on the anniversary of the July 2018 “trade truce” between European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker and US President Donald J. Trump, little progress has been made in trade negotiations between the United States and the European Union. This article is the second in a series that will take stock of the opportunities in and challenges to the deepest trading relationship in the world and focuses on two current high-profile disputes.

    US frustrations with the functioning and role of the World Trade Organization (WTO) figure prominently in the background of discussions with key trading partners, including the European Union (EU).  The United States and a number of its allies have for some time flagged areas of the WTO process they consider problematic. These include the self-designation as developing countries by China and others, which allows them to commit to a narrower range of WTO obligations; the notification procedures under which member

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  • US-European Trade Talks Stall

    Coming up on the anniversary of the July 2018 “trade truce” between European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker and US President Donald J. Trump, little progress has been made in trade negotiations between the United States and the European Union. This article is the first in a series that will take stock of the opportunities in and challenges to the deepest trading relationship in the world and focuses on the current state of discussions.


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  • Oosterveld Quoted in the National on Trade Agreements


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