Bart Oosterveld

  • What is Wrong with the WTO?

    Coming up on the anniversary of the July 2018 “trade truce” between European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker and US President Donald J. Trump, little progress has been made in trade negotiations between the United States and the European Union. This article is the third in a series that will take stock of the opportunities in and challenges to the deepest trading relationship in the world and focuses on WTO reform.

    The World Trade Organization (WTO), the largest multilateral trade organization and the foundation of the global trading system, has increasingly drawn the ire of the United States and other countries that view the organization as outdated and complacent as other countries skirt the rules to get ahead.


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  • Transatlantic Ties After the EU Elections: Prospects for Transatlantic Cooperation in Trade and Sanctions


    On June 10, the Atlantic Council’s Global Business & Economics Program’s and Future Europe Initiative hosted a roundtable discussion on the current state and the future of transatlantic ties featuring Caroline Vicini, Deputy Head of the EU Delegation to the United States. The event also served as a farewell to Ms. Vicini, who after several years of distinguished leadership in her current position will be soon leaving Washington, DC.

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  • Washington’s WTO Frustrations a Key Stumbling Block in Transatlantic Trade Ties

    Coming up on the anniversary of the July 2018 “trade truce” between European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker and US President Donald J. Trump, little progress has been made in trade negotiations between the United States and the European Union. This article is the second in a series that will take stock of the opportunities in and challenges to the deepest trading relationship in the world and focuses on two current high-profile disputes.

    US frustrations with the functioning and role of the World Trade Organization (WTO) figure prominently in the background of discussions with key trading partners, including the European Union (EU).  The United States and a number of its allies have for some time flagged areas of the WTO process they consider problematic. These include the self-designation as developing countries by China and others, which allows them to commit to a narrower range of WTO obligations; the notification procedures under which member

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  • US-European Trade Talks Stall

    Coming up on the anniversary of the July 2018 “trade truce” between European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker and US President Donald J. Trump, little progress has been made in trade negotiations between the United States and the European Union. This article is the first in a series that will take stock of the opportunities in and challenges to the deepest trading relationship in the world and focuses on the current state of discussions.


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  • Oosterveld Quoted in the National on Trade Agreements


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  • EU Elections Produce Fragmentation, But Also Opportunity for Europe

    After elections to the European Parliament from May 23 to 26 saw the two main political parties in Europe lose seats to smaller Euroskeptic and pro-integration parties, European leaders must now figure out how to navigate an increasingly fractured political landscape, while also capitalizing on renewed interest in the Union underscored by the highest voter turnout since 1994.

    Despite predictions that Euroskeptic, populist, and far-right parties would potentially swamp more pro-European integration parties, the elections saw only a moderate increase in Euroskeptic representation, while the solidly pro-European Union Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe (ALDE) and Greens-European Free Alliance (Greens) both saw double-digit seat increases. Emiliano Alessandri, a nonresident senior transatlantic fellow with the German Marshall Fund of the United States, said the result

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  • Europe’s Smaller Parties Win Big in European Parliament Elections

    Europe’s two major parties suffered considerable losses to smaller parties—both Euroskeptic and pro-European integration—in elections to the European Parliament from May 23 to May 26.

    While the center-right European People’s Party (EPP) and center-left Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats (S&D) remain the two largest parties in the European Parliament, both parties suffered double-digit seat losses, according to preliminary results. The big gainers of the night were the Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe (ALDE), which benefitted from the debut of French President Emmanuel Macron’s En Marche party, and an array of far-right Euroskeptic parties who made gains throughout Europe.


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  • Euroscepticism and Populism to Gain in Dutch Representation in the European Parliament

    As is the case elsewhere on the European continent, parties away from the political center are expected to perform quite well in the European parliamentary elections in the Netherlands on May 23. With twenty-six seats in the European Parliament allocated to the Netherlands, polls in recent weeks have suggested that around five will be won by the far-right populist, Eurosceptic Forum voor Democratie (Forum for Democracy or FvD), a party that did not contend in the last European elections in 2014. This is not unusual. Fringe parties tend to perform better in European elections than in the national elections, as seen in the 2012 general elections and subsequent European elections in 2014. A similar cycle could take place this time, as the European elections follow the general elections of 2017.


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  • Trump’s Strong Tariff Card And Why He Won’t Put It Away Anytime Soon

    A strong economy and the support of his base have created the conditions necessary for US President Donald J. Trump to ratchet up pressure on China in trade talks, according to the Atlantic Council’s Bart Oosterveld.

    The stock market’s “muted overall reaction to the threat of tariff escalation” and the fact “that the United States is performing exceptionally well on jobs and growth” have provided the administration “the economic leeway to take drastic measures against China,” said Oosterveld, who is the director of the Atlantic Council’s Global Business and Economics Program and C. Boyden Gray Fellow on Global Finance and Growth.


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  • Oosterveld Quoted in Think Progress on the US-China Trade War


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