Global Business & Economics Program

  • Washington’s WTO Frustrations a Key Stumbling Block in Transatlantic Trade Ties

    Coming up on the anniversary of the July 2018 “trade truce” between European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker and US President Donald J. Trump, little progress has been made in trade negotiations between the United States and the European Union. This article is the second in a series that will take stock of the opportunities in and challenges to the deepest trading relationship in the world and focuses on two current high-profile disputes.

    US frustrations with the functioning and role of the World Trade Organization (WTO) figure prominently in the background of discussions with key trading partners, including the European Union (EU).  The United States and a number of its allies have for some time flagged areas of the WTO process they consider problematic. These include the self-designation as developing countries by China and others, which allows them to commit to a narrower range of WTO obligations; the notification procedures under which member

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  • US-European Trade Talks Stall

    Coming up on the anniversary of the July 2018 “trade truce” between European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker and US President Donald J. Trump, little progress has been made in trade negotiations between the United States and the European Union. This article is the first in a series that will take stock of the opportunities in and challenges to the deepest trading relationship in the world and focuses on the current state of discussions.


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  • Oosterveld Quoted in the National on Trade Agreements


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  • Immigration and Tariffs: In Support of the Ongoing US-Mexico Border Diplomacy

    In an effort to head off the escalating tariffs on Mexican imports that US President Donald J. Trump has threatened to impose as of June 10, Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador (AMLO) dispatched cabinet members to Washington for meetings to work through the complex issues surrounding migration flows from Central America.


    If imposed, these US tariffs would have major near-term economic and political costs for the United States and Mexico. Over the longer term, they could cause serious damage to a bilateral relationship that has progressively become more important since the establishment of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) in 1994.

    There is plenty of responsibility to share for the immigration challenges being faced today on the US-Mexico border. 


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  • Montanino Joins CNBC to Discuss Snap Election in Italy


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  • US Cuba Policy: EU and Canadian Firms to Suffer?

    On April 17 2019, US Secretary of State Michael Pompeo announcedan important change in the United States’ policy toward Cuba: Title III of the Cuban Liberty and Democracy Solidarity Act of 1996 (LIBERTAD Act) would no longer be suspended. As a result of this decision, US claimants can now seek compensation for property confiscated by the Castro government. The move has important implications for US and foreign companies doing business in Cuba. This edition of the EconoGraphic explains the history and purpose of the LIBERTAD Act, evaluates the policy’s potential impact on US allies’ economic interests in Cuba, and highlights its implications for the pressure campaign against the Maduro regime in Venezuela.

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  • What Will it Take to Reconcile Europeans with Their Own Parliament?

    The recently concluded European parliamentary elections have fractured longstanding political alliances. From the Liberal and Green parties to the populists and Euroskeptics, voters have delivered a more fragmented European Parliament. Challenges abound as the European Union (EU) needs to among other things address climate change, rekindle sustainable economic growth, and address foreign policy issues. All of these are pan-European issues, which will require looking beyond national borders and setting up new coalitions to craft policy directions. The European Parliament can serve as a forum to reconcile Europe and its citizens, provided it becomes a public square for transnational debate.

    The European parliamentary elections—held this year from May 23 to 26—are one of the largest democratic displays in the world. Many observers, however, often view them as a “strange beast” and consequently ignore the consequences. The European Parliament shares responsibility with the

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  • Montanino in La Stampa: Lo Spread Viene dal Debito


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  • Europe’s Smaller Parties Win Big in European Parliament Elections

    Europe’s two major parties suffered considerable losses to smaller parties—both Euroskeptic and pro-European integration—in elections to the European Parliament from May 23 to May 26.

    While the center-right European People’s Party (EPP) and center-left Progressive Alliance of Socialists and Democrats (S&D) remain the two largest parties in the European Parliament, both parties suffered double-digit seat losses, according to preliminary results. The big gainers of the night were the Alliance of Liberals and Democrats for Europe (ALDE), which benefitted from the debut of French President Emmanuel Macron’s En Marche party, and an array of far-right Euroskeptic parties who made gains throughout Europe.


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  • Tran Quoted in the Financial Times on Trade and Economic Challenges


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