Global Business & Economics Program

  • Using Sanctions Against Human Rights Abusers and Kleptocrats


    On Tuesday, February 26, the Atlantic Council’s Global Business & Economics Program’s Economic Sanctions Initiative hosted a public discussion featuring Ms. Andrea Gacki, Director of the US Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (OFAC), on the Global Magnitsky Act’s uses, misuses, and lessons for business.


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  • A Conversation with Former Treasury Secretary Jacob J. Lew


    On Tuesday, February 19, the Atlantic Council’s Global Business and Economics program’s Economic Sanction Initiative hosted a public discussion featuring former US Treasury Secretary Jacob J. Lew.


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  • Economic Opportunity in the Energy Transition


    On Thursday, February 21, the Atlantic Council’s Global Business and Economics Program’s EuroGrowth Initiative and the Atlantic Council’s Global Energy Center.co-hosted a roundtable discussion on the economic and energy transition to a low-carbon society.


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  • Buy-In From Allies Critical for Effective Sanctions, Says Former US Treasury Secretary Lew

    US approaches to Iran and Venezuela provide a study in contrasts

    While the Trump administration’s decision to reimpose sanctions on Iran will be ineffective because the United States does not “have the support of our allies,” its approach to Venezuela—working in concert with friends—“represents more the way things ought to be done,” former US Treasury Secretary Jacob J. Lew said at the Atlantic Council in Washington on February 19.

    As the Trump administration and the US Congress increasingly view sanctions as effective means to achieve the United States’ foreign policy objectives, Lew, who also served as White House chief of staff to then President Barack Obama, had some advice: “Sanctions are most effective when there is broad buy-in around the world amongst our allies.”


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  • New Legislation Presents Impactful But Measured Way Forward on Russia Sanctions

    Driven by understandable distrust of US President Donald Trump’s continued relationship with Russian President Vladimir Putin, a bipartisan group of US senators have introduced legislation that, if passed, compels the Trump administration to increase the pressure on Moscow. The Defending American Security from Kremlin Aggression Act of 2019, or DASKAA, is a revisited, and improved version of the similarly named bill that was introduced in response to Trump’s widely panned July 2018 summit with Putin in Helsinki. Several additional Russian-related outrages later, this bill introduced by Senators Graham, Menendez, Cardin, Gardner, and Shaheen likely has a better chance of becoming law than its predecessor, which languished in a Congress distracted by a Supreme Court fight, the summer recess, a competing Russia sanctions bill, and the pre-election

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  • Sultoon Quoted in National Journal on Khashoggi Case


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  • The EU Draft Motion That Could Lead to Car Tariffs

    As US-China trade tensions calm down, they could escalate quickly on the transatlantic front

    While a US delegation led by Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Commerce Secretary Steven Mnuchin is in Beijing to try to de-escalate the current tariff tensions ahead of a March 1 deadline, clouds are gathering on the transatlantic trade front. A draft motion tabled by the European Parliament (EP) last week could end trade negotiations before they even officially start—and pave the way for US tariffs on European cars and car parts. With the US Commerce Department’s investigative report into whether foreign automobiles are a security threat to the United States due by February 18, European hesitation about the negotiating mandate could prove fatal.


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  • A Breakdown of the Sanctions Deal between the United States and Oleg Deripaska

    On January 16, a US Senate resolution to maintain US sanctions on the Russian aluminum giant RUSAL and its holding company EN+ failed to garner the necessary 60 votes to pass. As a result, the Trump administration lifted its economic sanctions on RUSAL and EN+ on January 27.

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  • Kasperek Joins Cheddar to Discuss China Trade Talks


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  • O'Toole Quoted in Newsweek on Impact of Sanctions on Russian Economy


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