Gulf Cooperation Council

  • Moving the New US-Saudi Relationship Beyond Reassurance

    Over the past two months, US and Saudi officials have done what they needed to do to calm the waters in US-Saudi relations. Senior officials visited Riyadh to discuss the status of the negotiations with Iran; the Saudi interior minister visited the United States to coordinate Syria policy more effectively; the vocal complaints of the Saudi establishment have been consciously muted since the outbreak of discontent late last year marked by the rejection of a UN Security Council seat.
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  • Saab on Gulf Relations

    Scowcroft Center Senior Fellow Bilal Saab is quoted by The National on how tensions within the Gulf Cooperation Council are affecting security interests in the United States:

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  • The Gulf and Geoeconomics

    The sizable financing provided by the Gulf countries, in particular Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates (UAE) to Egypt since the popular uprising in 2011 led many observers to conclude that Gulf states have started using their vast resources to shape the region, direct political developments, and mold strategic relationships; in other words, the Gulf is now engaged in “geoeconomics”—the use of economic instruments to achieve geopolitical objectives.
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  • Break Up in the Gulf

    On March 5, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates (UAE), and Bahrain announced that they had withdrawn their ambassadors from Qatar, claiming that Doha had been violating a clause in the Gulf Cooperation Council charter banning interference in the domestic affairs of fellow GCC members. The decision, unprecedented in the GCC’s history, hints at significant changes to come for the GCC and the balance of power in the Gulf.
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  • Hof and LeBaron Speak at Middle East Policy Council Conference

    Hariri Center Senior Fellows Richard LeBaron and Frederic Hof joined the Middle East Policy Council’s 75th Capitol Hill Conference to discuss Iran’s nuclear program and its policies in the region, the concerns of Gulf states and Israel, and how an agreement would affect the balance of power in the region.
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  • The Gulf is a Flashpoint for Cyber Conflict

    Cyberattack is a new tool of national power. It provides a means of coercion, influence, and warfare.
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  • Gulf Leadership Needed in Egypt, Not Just Cash

    Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, and the United Arab Emirates have been generous donors to Egypt over the last year, supporting the military efforts to neutralize the Muslim Brotherhood and allowing the Egyptian economy to limp along.
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  • The Promise and Perils of Gulf Aid

    In a hostile and unstable region, the Gulf Arab states have had to compensate for their limited capacity and appetite for military action. Using immense oil wealth and tight control of policymaking, the ruling families of the Gulf have refined aid and investment into sophisticated foreign policy tools. Gulf aid is likely to impact significantly on the Arab transition countries, helping them meet immediate financial obligations, but often at the expense of their long-term interests.
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  • Eroding Civil Liberties in Kuwait

    The sentencing of popular Kuwaiti opposition leader Musallem al-Barrak on April 15 for insulting the amir, Sheikh Sabah Al-Ahmad Al-Jaber Al-Sabah is part of a pattern of deteriorating civil liberties in Kuwait. Although the roots of the current conflict can be traced back to a 2006 social movement whose aim was to change the election law to make electoral corruption more expensive and difficult, the two unscheduled 2012 parliamentary elections (one in February 2012 and the second in December 2012) provide a convenient starting point from which to trace the current political conflict.
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  • The United States and the Gulf States: Uncertain Partners in a Changing Region

    Given the continued congruence of interests between the Gulf states and the United States and the potential for some Gulf states to play an even greater regional and global role, now is the time to reexamine the partnership and de-conflict interests. On February 7, Hariri Center senior fellow and retired US career diplomat Richard LeBaron presented his issue brief, “The United States and the Gulf States: Uncertain Partners in a Changing Region” at a roundtable discussion hosted by the Atlantic Council’s Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East and the Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security.


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