Josh Rudolph

  • Congress Should Explain How Dark Russian Money Infiltrates Western Democracies

    This is the second in a two-part series.

     

    One should expect a heated national debate about the political implications for US President Donald J. Trump once the key findings of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation become public. Few will stop at that point to ask what the evidence shows about how Russian meddling in the 2016 US election was possible, and what must be done now to protect American democracy and counter continued Russian hybrid warfare.


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  • Financial Transparency Legislation Would Help Defend US National Security

    This is the first in a two-part series.

    On December 8, 1941, the day after the attack on Pearl Harbor, the US Congress declared war on Japan. Two weeks after al Qaeda attacked the United States on September 11, 2001, the CIA was on the ground in Afghanistan.

    The Russian attack on US democracy in 2016 was not deadly, but it was similarly harmful to US national security. The West, however, has still not pushed back strongly enough to stop the hybrid war Moscow continues to wage against the United States and its European allies.


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  • Will China’s Economic Slowdown Lead to a Major Crisis?

    China has incurred the largest debt buildup in recorded economic history—and the prognosis is not good. The International Monetary Fund surveyed five-year credit booms near the size of China’s and found that essentially all such cases ended in major growth slowdowns and half also collapsed into financial crises.

    A 50 percent chance of a financial crisis for the world’s second-largest economy would represent one of the greatest threats to the global economy.

    Can China avoid a crisis? Both bears and bulls make equally compelling arguments about China’s current challenges, suggesting the probability of a major crisis is in line with the historic precedent of 50/50.

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  • Russian Sovereign Debt in the Crosshairs

    On September 6, the US Senate Banking Committee will hear expert testimony on draft Russia sanctions legislation, including the Defending American Security from Kremlin Aggression Act introduced this summer following US President Donald J. Trump’s summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Helsinki and amid reports that Russia continues to interfere in the run-up to the midterm elections in November.

    The late Sen. John McCain praised this bill in an August statement, saying “until Putin pays a serious price for his actions, these attacks on our democracy will only grow. This bill would build on the strongest sanctions ever imposed on the Putin regime for its assault on democratic institutions, violation of international treaties, and siege on open societies through cyberattacks and misinformation campaigns.”

    McCain was right. As noted...

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