Lebanon

  • Saab: Is Syria Spilling over into Lebanon?

    Brent Scowcroft Center Senior Fellow Bilal Saab talks with France24's Melissa Bell on recent suicide attacks in Beirut as well as the destabilizing effects of the Syrian conflict for the region:

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  • Saab on New Cabinet in Lebanon

    Brent Scowcroft Center Senior Fellow Bilal Saab is quoted in the Daily Star on Lebanon's new cabinet:

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  • Itani Talks Hariri Assassination Tribunal

    Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East Fellow Faysal Itani joins BBC World News to discuss the trial of four men accused of carrying out the 2005 assassination of Lebanese Prime Minister Rafik Hariri:

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  • Lebanon: Mohamad Bahaa Chatah, 1951-2013

    Mohamad Bahaa Chatah, former finance minister and Lebanese Ambassador to the United States, was assassinated in Beirut on December 27, 2013. It has taken me this long to write something about the passing of a friend and a paragon of human decency. When I think back about the Lebanon-related disasters that have occurred during the course of my adulthood, the killing of this fine man rates, in terms of personal impact, with the American embassy and Marine Corps bombings of 1983, the anti-American kidnapping and murder spree of the 1980s, and the assassination of Rafik Hariri in 2005.
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  • Itani Quoted on Lebanon Attacks

    Rafik Hariri Center Fellow Faysal Itani is quoted in the Washington Times on Hezbollah's influence in Lebanon:

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  • Lebanon’s Parliamentary Consultations: Political Breakthrough or Deadlock?

    Despite media warnings of a political vacuum in Lebanon following the resignation of Prime Minister Najib Mikati of Lebanon, many Lebanese politicians seem more relieved than worried. Although the government’s collapse does indeed raise the risk of destabilization as Lebanon grapples with the spillover effect of Syria’s war, the country’s current crisis is better described as an institutional drift that has created room for political maneuvering in an otherwise intractable environment. It is possible that the current political jockeying may actually ease the deadlock that has beset Lebanese institutions, allowing for an agreement on key issues. But Lebanon’s political players are also eager to exploit the shakeup, and extract concessions from and weaken their rivals; parties will likely see little incentive to compromise on issues of importance, leaving the fate of the government and upcoming parliamentary elections in the balance.
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  • The “Obama Effect” and Lebanon

    On March 20, 2003, the United States invaded Iraq. On April 9, Baghdad fell, ending Saddam Hussein’s tyrannical rule. 

    The effect of this victory seemed to transform the globe.


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