Lebanon

  • Will Hezbollah Expand Operations to Iraq?

    Lebanese security forces stormed the third-floor room of a suicide bomber at the Duroy Hotel in the upscale Beirut neighborhood of Raouche on June 25. They said it was a preventative measure, that the bomber—who blew himself up when police arrived—would have done it elsewhere, later.
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  • Saab: Lebanon’s Presidential Crisis Hangs on Saudi, Iranian Rivalry

    Brent Scowcroft Center Resident Senior Fellow for Middle East Security Bilal Y. Saab writes for World Politics Review on why the power struggle between Iran and Saudi Arabia is the root cause of the failure to elect a new Lebanese president:

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  • Lebanon: Being the Daughter of the Resistance

    Hanin Ghaddar, the Beirut-based Managing Editor of NOW, recently published an eloquent but hauntingly sad account of the status of Lebanese Shia who disagree publicly with the policies and ideology dictated by the leadership cadre of Hezbollah.
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  • Itani: Is the US Inadvertently Helping Hezbollah?

    Rafik Hariri Center Resident Fellow Faysal Itani writes  for The Hill on how well-intentioned policy by the United States may actually be harming the situation in Syria:


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  • The Search for Lebanon’s President

    The most important question underlying Lebanon’s presidential election is to what extent certain Lebanese parties—and their foreign backers—want to confront Hezbollah. It will not be answered by May 25, when the current president’s term expires, and will be largely influenced by regional developments, particularly the war in neighboring Syria.
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  • Lebanon's Neutrality Toward the Syrian Conflict

    After weeks of debate that nearly collapsed the government, Lebanon's cabinet approved a policy statement on March 14, 2014. The debate focused on Lebanon's position on the conflict in Syria and the role and future of Hezbollah's armed militia, over which the March 8 and March 14 alliances disagree. The conclusion of the debate and Parliament's vote of confidence in the government on March 21, 2014 ended nearly a year of institutional deadlock.
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  • Saab: In Lebanon, New Government Unlikely to Herald New Political Era

    Bilal Saab, senior fellow for the Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security, writes on Lebanon's new government and the likelihood of reforms in World Politics Review:

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  • Lebanon Stuck Between Leaky Borders and Politics

    A twenty year-old girl and a ten-year old boy were killed by Syrian government airstrikes last week. It would sound like any other day in Syria, except these strikes took place on the Lebanese side of the border, killing two Lebanese civilians and wounding several others.
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  • A Holding Action in Lebanon

    After ten months of stalling and infighting, Lebanon’s political factions have formed a cabinet. This does not indicate a broader political compromise, a willingness to tackle intractable and divisive issues, or a plan to address the country’s serious socio-economic problems. Rather, the cabinet’s significance lies in its makeup and the interesting compromises that led to its formation. These speak to the political calculations of key factions over the conflict in Syria, and reveal that Lebanon’s new cabinet will have a narrow and unambitious agenda.
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  • Saab: Is Syria Spilling over into Lebanon?

    Brent Scowcroft Center Senior Fellow Bilal Saab talks with France24's Melissa Bell on recent suicide attacks in Beirut as well as the destabilizing effects of the Syrian conflict for the region:

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