Rashad al-Kattan

  • The Smoke and Mirrors Effect of Lebanese Banks Exiting Syria

    Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s regime appears encouraged by the modest growth that the economy has finally begun to display. Those tasked with resuscitating the decimated economy have had to contend with an annual GDP drop of whopping 16 percent each year since the beginning of conflict in 2011. Compare this figure to the academic literature on the impact of civil wars on national economies, which posits that annual GDP growth typically slows by 2 percent.

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  • al-Kattan Quoted in Middle East Eye on Who's Going to Pay for Syria's Reconstruction


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  • al-Kattan Quoted in AP on Devastation in Raqqa


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  • Raqqa Falls. Now Comes the Hard Part

    As the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) is driven from its strongholds in Syria, US-backed forces face the challenge of stabilizing these conflict-ravaged territories.

    This task is made more urgent by the fact that Syrian President Bashar al-Assad’s forces and Iran-backed militias are swooping in on eastern Syria in an attempt to capitalize on ISIS’ defeat, said Frederic C. Hof, director of the Atlantic Council’s Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East.

    “If they succeed, the basis for ISIS 2.0 will be set,” said Hof, adding: “After all, it was the Iranian (and Russian)-supported brutality of the Assad regime that created the governance vacuum filled by ISIS in the first place.”

    The US-backed Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) said on October 16 that they had seized control of Raqqa, the de facto capital of...

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  • The Economic Case for Syria’s Stabilization

    It is fairly easy to consider Syria as a hopeless case, as the country seems trapped in a vicious cycle of nihilistic violence and colossal destruction. The economy is now completely shattered and fragmented, with each party building its own independent entities. The systematic – but imbalanced – collapse of economic foundations is seen across infrastructure and institutions, human and physical capital, and substantial part of wealth. The accumulated economic loss is estimated at $250 billion, with poverty rate at 85% and more than 70% of Syrians inside the country living in extreme poverty. Optimistic studies estimate that with a 5% annual economic growth, it will take at least 20 years and tens of billions of US dollars to recover to Syria’s 2010 $60 billion GDP.

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  • The US Must Hold the Regime Accountable in Reconstructing Syria

    Nearly six years of conflict have dramatically altered Syria's economy. To better understand these changes, SyriaSource interviewed Rashad al-Kattan, a researcher on Syria, about the state of Syria's economy. His responses give insight into how, even as the Syrian regime is winning on the military front, the long-term economic challenges paint a more complex picture about whether it can stabilize the country, and the difficulties the international community will face when considering reconstruction.

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  • The Reality of Economic Reconstruction in Syria

    Nearly six years of conflict have dramatically altered Syria's economy. To better understand these changes, SyriaSource interviewed Rashad al-Kattan, a researcher on Syria, about the state of Syria's economy. His responses give insight into how, even as the Syrian regime is winning on the military front, the long-term economic challenges paint a more complex picture about whether it can stabilize the country, and the difficulties the international community will face when considering reconstruction.

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  • The Syrian Economy Post 2011

    Nearly six years of conflict have dramatically altered Syria's economy. To better understand these changes, SyriaSource interviewed Rashad al-Kattan, a researcher on Syria, about the state of Syria's economy. His responses give insight into how, even as the Syrian regime is winning on the military front, the long-term economic challenges paint a more complex picture about whether it can stabilize the country, and the difficulties the international community will face when considering reconstruction.

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  • al-Kattan in War on the Rocks: Decisive Military Defections in Syria: A Case of Wishful Thinking


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  • The Path to US Cooperation with Russia and the Syrian Regime

    The recent announcement that the United States is willing to cooperate with Russia to target the al-Qaeda affiliated Nusra Front puts the country one step closer to directly cooperating with the Syrian regime. The US policy to consider the terrorist problem of Nusra and the Islamic State (ISIS) as separate from the larger civil war, while considering any escalation or military intervention against the Assad regime as folly, leads to the tactic of cooperating with any force that will fight terrorist groups.

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