Economy & Trade

  • US-China Trade War: Escalation With No End in Sight

    On May 10, the United States raised tariffs from 10 percent to 25 percent on $200 billion of imports from China, affecting about 5,700 categories of goods and covering almost one-third of capital and consumer goods. The new 25 percent tariff rate won’t apply to goods in transit—those that left China before May 10 and arriving in the United States before June 1. This delays the economic impact

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  • After China, Will the EU Be the Next Target of Trump’s Tariffs?

    When Chinese negotiators reportedly walked back some of their commitments to structural changes within the framework of a US-China trade deal late last week, US President Donald J. Trump...
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  • Trump’s Strong Tariff Card And Why He Won’t Put It Away Anytime Soon

    A strong economy and the support of his base have created the conditions necessary for US President Donald J. Trump to ratchet up pressure on China in trade talks, according to the Atlantic Council’s Bart Oosterveld.

    The stock market’s “muted overall reaction to the threat of tariff escalation” and the fact “that the United States is performing exceptionally well on jobs and growth”

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  • Strengthening the Global Trading Architecture


    On May 3, the Atlantic Council’s Global Business and Economics Program’s EuroGrowth Initiative hosted a roundtable discussion on the future of the global trading architecture featuring Ambassador Alan Wm. Wolff, Deputy Director-General of the World Trade Organization (WTO).

  • WTO in a Bind Over Trump’s National Security Tariffs

    A landmark decision by the World Trade Organization (WTO) affirming it has jurisdiction to review trade measures taken by a member claiming national security exceptions to WTO rules has put the body in a bind as the United States argues that the WTO does not have this authority.

    In a case brought by Ukraine against Russia in 2016, the WTO’s Dispute Settlement Panel ...
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  • US-Japan Trade Negotiations: A Narrow Scope is Key to Success

    US Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Japanese Economic Revitalization Minister Toshimitsu Motegi kicked off long-awaited trade negotiations between the United States and Japan in Washington this week. While both sides have agreed to accelerate the talks, their scope is unclear.


    Japan wants to focus on tariffs on industrial and agricultural goods, referring to the possible

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  • Brussels Agreed to Brexit Extension to Avoid No Deal, EU Official Says

    By agreeing to extend the deadline for the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the European Union (EU) to October 31, EU leaders and British Prime Minister Theresa May “managed to avoid the most disruptive [potential] scenario, which would have been no-deal Brexit,” top European Commission official Valdis Dombrovskis said at the Atlantic Council in Washington on April 12.

    The extension,

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  • The Spark That Launched Brexit Has Returned and Could Torpedo Compromise

    The next week matters for European policy makers. EU finance ministers are meeting in Brussels on April 5 and 6. This will be followed by an emergency European Council summit on April 10 at which EU leaders will not only discuss Brexit, but also discuss the European Union’s position on negotiating a narrow free trade agreement with the United States. On April 12, European finance ministers

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  • The WTO May Be Beyond Saving

    US President Donald J. Trump created ripples when he said on August 30, 2018, that if the World Trade Organization (WTO) doesn’t “shape up, I would withdraw from the WTO.” Trump’s comments highlighted growing complaints against the WTO — voiced most loudly by the

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  • USMCA is Not a Done Deal. It Must Still Clear Three Legislative Hurdles

    On November 30, the leaders of the United States, Canada, and Mexico signed the US-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement (USMCA), modernizing the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and “rebalancing” trade relations between the three countries, according to the US administration.  Before the new pact officially takes effect, however, the legislatures of all three countries need to

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