A Conversation with Barbara Humpton, CEO, Siemens USA

December 13, 2018 - 10:00 am

Atlantic Council headquarters, 1030 15th Street, NW, 12th Floor
Washington, DC

A Conversation with Barbara Humpton, CEO, Siemens USA


Opening remarks by:


Amb. Richard Morningstar

Founding Chairman, Global Energy Center

Atlantic Council


A conversation with:


Barbara Humpton

Chief Executive Officer

Siemens USA


Moderated by:


Sherri Goodman

Board Director

Atlantic Council;

Former Deputy Undersecretary of Defense (Environmental Security)

 


Please join the Atlantic Council Global Energy Center on Thursday, December 13, 2018 from 10:00 to 11:00 a.m. for a lively conversation with Siemens US CEO Barbara Humpton.


A cluster of new technologies including AI, blockchain, and robotics, along with continued innovation in clean technology, has the possibility to profoundly reshape global energy systems and geopolitics. Bringing to bear her energy and national security expertise, Siemens US CEO Barbara Humpton will discuss her view of which technologies promise to be the most impactful for advancing energy security, decarbonization, and the digital economy—and how, in turn, these technologies will reshape global business and geopolitics.


A light breakfast will be served.



On Twitter? Follow @ACGlobalEnergy and use #ACEnergy


Atlantic Council

1030 15th Street NW, 12th Floor (West Tower Elevator) 

Washington, DC 


This event is open to press and on the record.


VISITING THE COUNCIL: Metro and parking info



Bios

Barbara Humpton is the chief executive officer of Siemens USA, where she guides the company’s strategy and engagement in serving the company’s largest market in the world, with more than 50,000 employees and over $23 billion in revenues and $5 billion in annual exports.


Most recently, Humpton served as president and CEO of Siemens Government Technologies, Inc. (SGT), a leading integrator of Siemens’ products and services for federal government agencies and departments. In this role, Humpton also served as an officer/director member of the board of directors of SGT.


Prior to joining Siemens in 2011, Humpton served as a vice president at Booz Allen Hamilton where she was responsible for program performance and new business development for technology consulting in the Department of Justice and Department of Homeland Security. Earlier, Humpton was a vice president at Lockheed Martin Corporation with responsibility for Biometrics Programs, Border and Transportation Security and Critical Infrastructure Protection, including such critical programs as the FBI’s Next Generation Identification and the TSA’s Transportation Workers’ Identification Credential.


Humpton is a graduate of Wake Forest University with a bachelor’s degree in mathematics. She serves on the board of directors of MorganFranklin, the American Heart Association Greater Washington Region, the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments (CSBA), and The George Washington University Law School Government Contracts Advisory Board. She resides in Washington, DC, with her husband David. 


Sherri Goodman is an experienced leader and senior executive, lawyer and director in the fields of national security, energy, science, oceans and environment. She is currently a Senior Fellow at the Woodrow Wilson International Center and CNA, and a Senior Advisor for International Security at the Center for Climate and Security. Previously, she served as the President and CEO of the Consortium for Ocean Leadership.


Goodman served as Senior Vice President and General Counsel of CNA (Center for Naval Analyses) where she was also the founder and Executive Director of the CNA Military Advisory Board, whose landmark reports include National Security and the Threat of Climate Change (2007), and National Security and the Accelerating Risks of Climate Change (2014), Advanced Energy and US National Security (2017), and The Role of Water Stress in Instability and Conflict (2017) among others. The film The Age of Consequences in which Goodman is featured, is based on the work of the CNA Military Advisory Board.


Goodman served as the first Deputy Undersecretary of Defense (Environmental Security) from 1993-2001.  As the chief environmental, safety, and occupational health officer for the Department of Defense (DoD), she oversaw an annual budget of over $5 billion. She established the first environmental, safety and health performance metrics for the Department and, as the nation’s largest energy user, led its energy, environmental and natural resource conservation programs. Overseeing the President’s plan for revitalizing base closure communities, she ensured that 80% of base closure property became available for transfer and reuse. Ms. Goodman has twice received the DoD medal for Distinguished Public Service, the Gold Medal from the National Defense Industrial Association, and the EPA’s Climate Change Award.


Goodman has served on the staff of the Senate Armed Services Committee for Committee Chairman Senator Sam Nunn. She has practiced law at Goodwin Procter, as both a litigator and environmental attorney, and has worked at RAND and SAIC.


Goodman serves on the boards of the Atlantic Council and its Resilience Center, the Joint Ocean Commission Leadership Council, the Marshall Legacy Institute, the National Executive Committee of the US Water Partnership, the Advisory Committee of the US Global Change Research Program and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). She is a life member of the Council on Foreign Relations, served on its Arctic Task Force in 2016 and on the Board of its Center for Preventive Action.


Previously, she served on the Boards of Blue Star Families, the Committee on Conscience of the U.S. Holocaust Museum, the National Academy of Sciences’ Boards on Energy and Environmental Systems (BEES) and Environmental Systems and Toxicology (BEST), the Secretary of State’s International Security Advisory Board,  and the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution. 


She has also served on the Responsibility to Protect Working Group co-chaired by former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright.


In 2010, Goodman served on the Quadrennial Defense Review Independent Panel co-chaired by former National Security Advisor Stephen Hadley and former Secretary of Defense Bill Perry.


Goodman has testified before numerous committees of the U.S. Congress, and conducted interviews with print, television, radio and online media. She has published widely in various print and on line media and in legal and scholarly journals. She has been an Adjunct Lecturer in International Affairs and Security at the Kennedy School of Government and an Adjunct Research Fellow at the Kennedy School’s Center for Science and International Affairs.


The daughter of Holocaust refugees who arrived in New York in the late 1930s, she was born in Queens. 


A summa cum laude graduate of Amherst College, she earned a law degree from Harvard Law School and a masters in public policy degree from the Harvard Kennedy School of Government.


Richard L. Morningstar is the founding chairman of the Global Energy Center and a board director at the Atlantic Council. He served as the US ambassador to the Republic of Azerbaijan from July 2012 to August 2014.


Prior to his appointment, since April 2009, he was the Secretary of State's special envoy for eurasian energy. Prior to that, Morningstar lectured at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard and Stanford Law School.


From June 1999 to September 2001, he served as United States ambassador to the European Union. Prior to this, Morningstar served as special adviser to the President and Secretary of State for Caspian Basin energy diplomacy, where he was responsible for assuring maximum coordination within the executive branch and with other governments and international organizations to promote United States policies on Caspian Basin energy development and transportation. From April 1995 to July 1998, he served as ambassador and special adviser to the President and Secretary of State on assistance for the new independent states of the former Soviet Union, where he oversaw all US bilateral assistance and trade investment activities in the NIS. From 1993 to 1995, he served as senior vice president of the Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC).


Morningstar also served as chairman of the board and chief executive officer of the Costar Corporation from 1990 to 1993 and as president and chief executive officer from 1981 to 1990. He was an attorney with Peabody and Brown (now Nixon and Peabody) in Boston from 1970 to 1981, where he became a partner in 1977.


Morningstar served as a commissioner of the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws (1989–1993). Prior to returning to the government in 2009, he served as director of the American Councils for International Education, a trustee of the Kosovo-America Educational Foundation, and a trustee of the Eurasia Foundation. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations.


Morningstar received his BA from Harvard in 1967 and JD from Stanford Law School in 1970.



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