News

The Atlantic Council was delighted to host Ali Babacan, Deputy Prime Minister of Turkey for a small-circle, off-the-record lunch discussion.

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American and European businesses are looking for avenues of investment in Africa, but are often stymied by the complexity and diversity of the continent’s national markets. As investor interest in the continent peeks, the African Development Bank (AfDB) has taken the lead in facilitating new investments on the continent. The Bank’s 2015 election of a new president is approaching, and the Africa Center hosted a roundtable with AfDB presidential candidate Birama Boubacar Sidibé, a 23-year veteran of the AfDB who is currently serving as vice president of operations of the Islamic Development Bank. Over lunch with a group of stakeholders convened by the Atlantic Council’s Africa Center, Sidibé shared his vision for the AfDB's future.

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The economy of Angola is on the verge of a major transition: financial market regulations have been established, secondary debt markets are opening up, and a new stock exchange will be coming on line in 2016. This was part of the optimistic assessment presented by Vice Governor of National Bank of Angola Ricardo Viegas D’Abreu and Vera Esperança dos Santos Daves, Executive Director for the country’s Capital Markets Commission. Within the context of Africa’s buoyant economic prospects, Angola’s rapidly changing financial system constitutes a critical component in the continent’s economic narrative. 

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Africa Center Director J. Peter Pham is quoted by U.S. News & World Report on Rwanda's progress since the genocide that shocked the world twenty years ago:

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CNBC quotes Brent Scowcroft Center Senior Fellow Ian Brzezinski on Russia's ability to withstand economic sanctions in the wake of the invasion of Crimea:

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Program Assistant Ian Hansen writes on the various factors constraining US action in Europe's East for New Eastern Europe:

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Montenegro's Prime Minister Milo Djukanovic is optimistic about his country's chances of receiving an invitation to join NATO in Wales at the September 2014 NATO summit. He praised US support for Montenegro's ambition during his speech at the Atlantic Council on April 8.

Djukanovic said that his country is in an "encouraging place," and noted that it has "fulfilled all realistic expectations" required thus far in order to be accepted as a full NATO member state. He pointed to progress made on the seven negotiating chapters that have been opened, including the chapters with the most complex requirements.

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The business of commodity trading is one that enables the fulfillment of basic human needs, yet misunderstandings and adverse opinions are common toward the industry that largely undergirds today's global economy. On April 8th, 2014, the Atlantic Council's Energy and Environment Program hosted the event, "Scanning the Horizon: Commodities Trading and Energy Markets," a discussion that included a diverse set of government, industry, and NGO stakeholders. University of Houston Professor Craig Pirrong presented on the key findings of his March 2014 whitepaper, "The Economics of Commodity Trading Firms." The Trafigura-funded report seeks to increase the understanding of the commodity trading world and illuminate how commodity trading firms (CTFs) operate.

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The Georgetown Journal of International Law, in collaboration with the Atlantic Council, held a high-level symposium entitled International Financial Regulation in the Post-Crisis Era on Tuesday, April 8, 2014 at Georgetown Law in Washington, DC.

The event featured commentary from leading scholars and practitioners in the field of international financial regulation, as well as officials from the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and US treasury department. Throughout the symposium, the experts expressed their views on what they believed were the most pressing issues facing the international financial system, and what methods should be used to improve the system in the future.

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Despite the “never again” rhetoric that followed the 1994 Rwandan genocide, terrible violence in some African states—such as the Central African Republic, Somalia, and South Sudan—persists, and the international response to these crises has generally been slow and inadequate. The twentieth anniversary of the genocide is cause for reflection, and the Africa Center hosted an event on Tuesday that addressed the question of what, if anything, the international community has learned about preventing genocide since 1994. The event featured H.E. Mathilde Mukantabana, Rwandan ambassador to the United States, Jonas Claes, senior program officer at the US Institute for Peace, and E.J. Hogendoorn, deputy director for Africa at the International Crisis Group, in a panel discussion moderated by Africa Center Director J. Peter Pham.

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