Frances Burwell

  • Burwell in Rzeczpospolita: Poland's Strength Lies in the European Union's Strength


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  • Burwell Joins the Diane Rehm Show to Discuss the Ongoing Migrant Crisis and What it Means for the Future of Europe


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  • Brexit: And Now It Begins…

    For all the sturm und drangthat accompanied British Prime Minister David Cameron’s negotiations with his European partners on February 19, the specific topics addressed—and the points won by the Prime Minister—were remarkably small. The implications of those negotiations, however, could be immense, both for the United Kingdom and for Europe. Whether the British people vote to “remain” or “leave” on June 23, the campaign will be based on competing arguments for the separateness of the United Kingdom from the European Union. If the United Kingdom leaves, it will be striking out on its own in a challenging world.  If it stays, it will do so as a reluctant, ambivalent member, with reduced credibility and influence.

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  • In Brexit Debate, David Cameron Averts Crisis. For Now.

    British leader’s decision to allow cabinet to pick sides on relationship with EU may not work in the long term, says Fran Burwell

    British Prime Minister David Cameron’s decision to allow members of his cabinet to pick sides and actively campaign for the United Kingdom to stay in or leave the European Union avoids a split in his government and Conservative Party for now, but may not succeed in these objectives in the long term, says the Atlantic Council’s Fran Burwell.

    Cameron has promised to hold an in/out referendum on whether the United Kingdom should remain part of the EU. That vote could take place as early as this summer.

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  • A Look Back, A Look Ahead

    Here’s what our experts have chosen as the top stories of 2015, and the big stories that they will be watching closely in 2016.


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  • In 2016, All Eyes on Britain’s In-Out EU Referendum

    Vote will have serious consequences either way, says Atlantic Council’s Fran Burwell

    As 2015 draws to a close, our experts take a look back at the year that was and look ahead to 2016.

    This interview is part of a series.

    Fran Burwell is the Vice President of European Union and Special Initiatives at the Atlantic Council.

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  • After Paris, Will the United States and Europe Give Migrants the Cold Shoulder?

    Atlantic Council’s Fran Burwell and Faysal Itani say despite calls for stronger screening, some terrorists will inevitably get through

    The discovery of a Syrian passport near the scene of a suicide bombing in Paris on Nov. 13 and confirmation that one of the attackers had entered Europe as part of a wave of hundreds of thousands of migrants has put a spotlight on the security implications of the migrant influx. Despite calls for tougher measures, including stricter border controls and background checks for migrants fleeing war zones, it is unlikely that a failsafe method can be developed to prevent attacks like the ones in Paris.

    “Unfortunately, the phenomenon of ‘foreign fighters’ makes it most likely that future terrorists in the United States and Europe will be citizens who travel on their own passports, rather than those entering illegally or under pretense,” said Fran Burwell, Vice President of European Union and Special Initiatives at the Atlantic Council.

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  • David Cameron Wants EU to Reform. Will He Get His Way?

    British Prime Minister unlikely to get his way on curbing welfare payments to EU migrants, says Atlantic Council’s Fran Burwell

    British Prime Minister David Cameron will likely get some of his demands for reform of the European Union, but on at least one — curbing welfare payments for EU citizens migrating to the United Kingdom — he is likely to face considerable pushback, said Fran Burwell, Vice President for European Union and Special Initiatives at the Atlantic Council.

    Cameron, in a letter to European Council President Donald Tusk on Nov. 10, presented four goals for reforming the United Kingdom’s membership of the European Union. He wants to increase economic competitiveness within the EU, a larger role for national parliaments, safeguards for countries that do not use the euro, and to slow migration by other EU citizens to the United Kingdom by curbing welfare payments for four years.

    “Things like competitiveness is the direction Europe wants to go in any way,” said Burwell.

    But Cameron will find it more difficult to get his way on removing the words “ever closer union” from European treaties and barring immigrants from other EU countries from social welfare benefits for four years, she said.

    “The obstacle he is more likely to face is the charge at home that he has not been ambitious enough. There are those in Britain who want a total remake of the relationship, and I don’t think he comes close to that,” she added.

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  • Burwell on the EU Refugee Crisis Summit

    International Business Times quotes Vice President for European Union and Special Initiatives Frances G. Burwell on the upcoming EU refugee crisis summit and why EU countries are more focused on immediate solutions:

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  • Burwell on the European Union and TTIP

    Vice President for European Union and Special Initiatives Frances G. Burwell joins the CATO Institute to discuss the geopolitical and security implications of the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP):

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