Yussef Auf

  • The State of Emergency in Egypt: An Exception or Rule?

    The presidential decree issued on October 10, 2017 re-declaring state of emergency for three months, raised widespread debate. This decree was the third of its kind in 2017. Egypt has a long history of exceptional laws (the emergency law being among the most prominent of them). Since the 1952 Officers Movement, Egypt has been governed for decades by many regulations and exceptional laws that are considered a violation of public law. Public law is all general legislations issued by parliament to regulate public affairs based on honoring the rights and freedoms of individual citizens. Public law is normally applied by the regular (non-military and non-exceptional) judiciary.

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  • Yussef Auf in the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace: The Battle Over Appointing Judges in Egypt


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  • Islam and Sharia Law

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    With the meteoric rise of Islamic political movements in 2011, the issue of Sharia law has come to the forefront of a debate around the role of religion in governance. In his issue brief “Islam and Sharia Law,” Atlantic Council’s Nonresident Fellow Yussef Auf identifies and explains the challenges of incorporating Sharia law into the legal framework of modern governments, using the example of Egypt to enumerate the difficulties of codifying religious doctrine into law. Auf discusses how Sharia law attempts to regulate public life in three different domains: political governance, the Islamic legal system, and the economic system.

     



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  • Atlantic Council Launches Network of Middle East-based Fellows

    The Atlantic Council’s Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East launched this spring a network of nonresident fellows. Based in the Middle East and North Africa, the network brings to the Council new perspectives and locally driven analysis on the processes of change and transition in the Arab world. 
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  • The Big Picture: Egypt’s Presidential Elections and its Future

    Egypt has remained without an elected president since last July 3, when its military removed former president Mohamed Morsi from office amid widespread popular demonstrations. Former defense minister Abdel Fattah al-Sisi, who led Morsi's ouster and initially denied presidential ambitions, announced his candidacy on March 27 and is expected to soundly defeat his sole opponent, Nasserist Hamdeen Sabbahi, in the May 26-27 polls. On May 15, the Atlantic Council hosted a panel discussion on the upcoming vote and what it means for Egypt's near-term future. Amy Hawthorne, a senior fellow at the Atlantic Council's Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East, moderated an expert discussion among Yussef Auf, an Egyptian judge and nonresident fellow at the Atlantic Council, Michael Hanna, senior fellow at The Century Foundation, and H.A. Hellyer, nonresident fellow at The Brookings Institution.
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  • Egypt's Growing Judicial Activism Stymies Democratic Consolidation

    On May 13, the Atlantic Council’s Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East held an event to release a new issue brief, "Egypt’s Litigious Transition: Judicial Intervention and the Muddied Road to Democracy." Director of the Rafik Hariri Center Michele Dunne moderated a discussion with the author Mahmoud Hamad, who is assistant professor at Drake University and Cairo University, and Yussef Auf, a nonresident fellow with the Hariri Center, who joined via Skype.
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