Recent Events

Last week, Venezuela’s Nicolás Maduro was sworn in for his second term following last year’s fraudulent electoral process. Despite international condemnation and rising domestic pressure, Maduro is unwilling to relegate his hold on the country. On January 9, the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center launched an infographic and hosted a conference call with the new leadership of the Venezuelan National Assembly, Juan Guaidó, president of the National Assembly and  Stalin González, second vice president, to provide insights on the opposition’s strategy to counter Maduro’s power frenzy.

Guest moderator John Paul Rathbone, the Financial Times Latin America editor, started the conversation with Juan Guaidó  by asking about the upcoming actions the opposition will take to initiate a democratic transition in Venezuela. President Guaidó, stressed the severity of current political conditions and future challenges the National Assembly will face – being this the only recognized democratic institution. Guaidó declared the National Assembly’s mission is to make “this usurpation of power cease.”

On December 3, 2018, the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center gathered distinguished experts to discuss the US-China trade-and-investment relationship. It was the purpose of this forum to rigorously analyze and at times debate the tenuous relationship between the world’s two largest economies and formally introduce the report China-Latin America Trade at a Moment of Uncertainty: What Lies Ahead in 2019?, an Atlantic Council publication authored by Anabel González, former Costa Rican minister of trade and the World Bank’s former senior director of Global Practice on Trade and Competitiveness.

Almost twenty-five years ago, the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) between the United States, Mexico, and Canada went into force and became a critical part of the North American economy. On Friday, November 30, 2018 these three countries will sign a new, modernized trade deal known as the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement or USMCA. As did its predecessor, this agreement will impact millions of jobs, trade-dependent communities, and investment in key sectors.
On October 28, Brazilians elected their next president: Jair Bolsonaro. He will step into office at a pivotal economic moment for Brazil, following a campaign of heightened polarization. Can the newly elected leader, alongside new voices in Congress, implement the reforms necessary to usher Brazil into a new economic era? To discuss the future of Brazil’s commercial and investment outlook, and what’s next for US-Brazil relations, the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center and Global Business and Economics Program hosted a public event on November 1, two days after election outcomes were announced.
A day after the second round of elections in Brazil, the Atlantic Council's Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center hosted a Members and Press Call to discuss what Bolsonaro's presidency might mean for Brazil and for the future of US-Brazil bilateral relations. Below is the complete transcript and audio of the call.
Days after the first round of voting in the Brazilian election, the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center and Digital Forensic Research Lab (DFRLab) hosted the conference call “Brazil's Vote: The Role of Disinformation in the 2018 Elections” to discuss the impact of disinformation and misinformation on Sunday’s results.

The Atlantic Council’s #ElectionWatch Latin America initiative has identified, exposed, and explained disinformation and the spread of misinformation in this year’s elections in Colombia, Mexico, and Brazil. In Brazil, findings reveal that disinformation and misinformation circulated across Latin America's biggest democracy as voters headed to the polls in an extremely polarized environment.
On Tuesday, October 9, only two days after the first round of voting in Brazil, the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America, the Brazil-US Business Council, and the Brazil Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars hosted the conference call “Brazilian Elections: Results and Expectations” to discuss the impact of the outcomes ahead of second-round voting on October 28. 

Paulo Sotero, director of the Brazil Institute at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, kicked off the call with opening remarks, and Renata Vasconcellos, senior director of the Brazil-US Business Council, moderated the discussion between Ricardo Sennes, nonresident senior fellow at the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center, and Monica de Bolle, director of the Latin American Studies and Emerging Markets Department at Johns Hopkins University (SAIS).
Just minutes before the September 30 deadline, the United States and Canada – following the US-Mexico deal – reached a new trade accord that modernizes the nearly 25-year-old North American Free Trade Agreement. The newly rebranded United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement is now set to be signed before December 1, 2018. The Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center, in partnership with the Atlantic Council’s Global Business and Economics Program held a rapid reaction conference call on Tuesday, October 2 to discuss key points of the deal and the implications for the future of North American relations. Below is the audio recording and summary.
On Monday, August 27, 2018, President Trump announced that the United States and Mexico reached a deal on several contentious issues in NAFTA, calling it the United States-Mexico Trade Agreement. The Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center, in partnership with the Atlantic Council’s Global Business and Economics Program held a conference call the following day to discuss the implications on NAFTA’s three parties, their respective bilateral relations, and the overall future of North American relations.

The call featured the following speakers: Jason Marczak, director of the Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center; Valeria Moy, nonresident fellow of the Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center Atlantic Council and director of México, ¿Cómo vamos?; Miguel Noyola, partner and member of the Global International Commercial and Trade Practice Group at Baker McKenzie; and Bart Oosterveld, the C. Boyden Gray fellow on Global Finance and Growth and director of Global Business & Economics Program Atlantic Council.
On August 16, the first official day of the Brazilian presidential campaign, the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center, in partnership with the Brazilian Center for International Relations (CEBRI), hosted the conference call, “Brazil’s Election Takes Shape.” The discussion focused on three primary issue facing the incoming administration: economic reform and trade; political reform; and safety and citizen security.


    

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