Publications

This compendium contains the text of major regulations, laws, and other documents governing U.S. interactions with North Korea. Also provided are the text of U.N. Resolutions, agreements, and other documents that represent major policy decisions in U.S. relations with North Korea. Accompanying each major document, law, or regulation is a brief analysis discussing the policy reflected by that document and major significance of the provisions of the law or regulation promulgated.

Download the PDF

Read More

Throughout 2006, allegations of U.S. involvement in “renditions” of suspected terrorists from Europe to prisons in Afghanistan and elsewher­e reverberated around European capitals. Charges that the United States had established secret prisons in some European countries raised the temperature even further. The European Parliament and the Council of Europe initiated investi­gations, while some European leaders called for the United States to close its detention facility in Guantanamo, describing the facility as contrary to international law. The controversy over Guantanamo and U.S. treatment of “enemy combatants” is only the latest example of transatlantic differences over international legal matters.
Download the PDF

Read More

North_Korean_missile_tests-400x300.jpg

The United States has few more important policy goals than eliminating North Korea's nuclear weapons program. The risk that the repressive Pyongyang regime could transfer nuclear weapons and materials to rogue states or terrorist groups weighs particularly heavy on the minds of U.S. policymakers.

Download the PDF

Read More

germany-train.jpg

During the second half of 2006 and in early 2007, the German economic eng­ine seemed to gain speed, moving into recovery after several years of stagnation. Whether this recovery is sustainable is still unclear, however. With its­ reliance on exports, Germany remains vulnerable to any downturn in the global economy. Nor is it yet clear that the recent upswing will result in long term job growth and increased consumer spending.
Download the PDF

Read More

Transatlantic Cooperation for Clean Air: Summary of Conference

Although the United States and the European Union have for many years pursued different approaches on the issues of air quality and climate change, those strategies are now beginning to intersect. Their policy objectives are increasingly similar, and they can learn much from each other’s experience with regulation, market incentives, and enforcement. Today, transatlantic cooperation could be enormously beneficial in developing new technologies and new regulatory frameworks, and in reaching out to developing countries, such as China and India.

Download the PDF

Read More

usa-eu-flags2.jpg

With the fall of the Berlin Wall, the face of Europe has been transformed. Most Americans have focused on the geopolitical and security dimensions of these changes, overlooking another signifi cant aspect: the evolution and expansion of the European Union. Europe today is a unique construction, comprised neither of individual, sovereign states, nor of a single unitary state, but something in between. Th is construction has its imperfections, but it is durable. Even after the French and Dutch electorates rejected the EU’s proposed Constitutional Treaty in 2005, the EU remains the central political institution in Europe.

Download the PDF

Read More

President Bush and Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia

The September 11th terrorist attacks and their aftermath have not altered Saudi Arabia’s fundamental importance in the international arena nor its importance to the United States. Saudi Arabia remains the source of much of the world’s oil reserves, the site of the holiest places in Islam, and the crossroad of strategic lines of communication between Europe and Asia.

Download the PDF

Read More

In late November, the leaders of the NATO nations will gather in Riga for “a transformation summit.” Yet, if the agenda develops as currently planned, the Alliance will not even consider a fundamental element of transformation — building a new partnership with the European Union. The failure to establish a strong relationship with the EU has contributed greatly to the intra-Alliance tensions concerning NATO’s purpose and future tasks. As the EU accelerates the development of its security and military component, the potential for overlap with NATO has grown, giving rise to confusion over the relative roles of these two institutions in the transatlantic security architecture. By failing to address this reality, NATO will leave the door open to further tension and rivalry.

Download the PDF

Read More

Top Secret

Colonel Daniel Putbrese, USAF, an Atlantic Council Senior Fellow, argues in  "Intelligence Sharing: Getting the National Counterterrorism Analysts on the Same Data Sheet" that it is imperative that national counterterrorism centers be able to access undisseminated  data before it has been analyzed, filtered, and/or packaged and that doing so requires a radical change in the Intelligence Community's professional culture.

Download the PDF

Read More

The challenges of winning the peace, as well as winning the war, have gained increasing attention among NATO members. This development reflects hard-learned lessons from Alliance experiences in the Balkans and Afghanistan. Despite attention at all levels, corresponding changes have yet to be institutionalized within NATO. This resistance to change is, in part, normal bureaucratic inertia, but it also reflects a lack of consensus about the extent to which NATO should be involved in establishing and sustaining a peace. Differences within the Alliance on appropriate roles for NATO beyond winning wars are coming to the surface in the debate over the immediate post-war tasks of stabilisation operations and initial reconstruction efforts, which we refer to in this report by the acronym "S&R".
Download the PDF

Read More