Georgia

  • Linderman Quoted by Accent on the Georgian Government


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  • Georgia at a Crossroad

    Georgia today is a very different country from what it was four years ago. Owing in large part to its strong regional relationships and geographic location, Georgia has enhanced its partnerships with Europe and the United States, and has also become increasingly relevant to East Asia, largely through trade. It is now time to reflect not only on what we have achieved over the past four years, but on where we want to go in the future.

    As Georgians head to the polls for parliamentary elections on October 8, we must decide whether to consolidate our democracy, economy, and role in the world. Georgia must assume responsibility for building its own new democratic traditions.

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  • Benitez Quoted by Accent on a US Military Base in Georgia


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  • Georgia’s European Choice ‘Irreversible,’ says Georgian Prime Minister

    In an election season in which Georgia’s NATO aspirations have been hotly debated, Georgian Prime Minister Giorgi Kvirikashvili insists that his country’s European choice is “irreversible.”

    “An overwhelming majority of the people of Georgia consider the goal of joining EU and NATO to be a necessity that will lead to a higher standard of democracy, security, peace, and prosperity in our country and region,” Kvirikashvili said in an interview.

    Georgia will hold parliamentary elections on October 8.

    “While there are policy differences between many of the political parties running for office, it is remarkable that all major parties are unified in their commitment to further integration with the West,” said Kvirikashvili.

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  • Cohen Interviewed by Georgia Today on US-Russia-Georgia Relations


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  • Cohen Quoted by VOA on Georgia as a Key Ally


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  • Linderman Joins VOA Georgia to Discuss the Eighth Anniversary of the Russia-Georgian War


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  • Bryza Interviewed by VOA Georgia on the Eighth Anniversary of Russia's Invasion of Georgia


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  • Saakashvili in Odesa: When Making Waves is Not Enough

    A year after my Atlantic Council blog post on Mikheil Saakashvili’s first fifty days as Odesa oblast governor, it’s time to reexamine his record. The results are mixed: his brisk and spectacular first wins soon hit the skids. The Presidential Administration’s promised support evaporated in late 2015 and Saakashvili’s many initiatives were skillfully torpedoed at every corner. Today Saakashvili is essentially locked in a stalemate against his local adversaries and has reached the ceiling of his reform deliverables. In short, Saakashvili’s time in Odesa is a microcosm painfully illustrating Ukraine’s thorny path to democracy.

    On the surface, Odesa looks like a glossy magazine cover. The possible host of the 2017 Eurovision contest, its diverse cultural scene and increased investment potential are attracting a growing number of tourists and business partners. The red carpet at the Odesa International Film Festival, sunny beaches, and the bewildering variety of new shops, restaurants, and hotels make this beautiful city a living symbol of the “unbearable lightness of being.”

    But scrape away the fresh paint and cracks appear.

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  • Turkey: Another US Intelligence Failure

    A less-well known but vital outcome of NATO’s Warsaw summit was the Alliance’s decision to create an intelligence and security division from among its existing organizations. This move is long overdue. There is a plethora of threats facing Europe and the United States, and yet the West has a record of intelligence failures that has come to characterize its policy today. As media reports indicate, the Turkish coup caught virtually the entire US foreign policy establishment by surprise; analysts were writing up to the last moment that Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s control over the military seemed secure.

    Intelligence failures are always going to occur no matter how governments structure their intelligence networks, but this is only the latest in a series of policy failures in which governments have blamed their intelligence organizations. In this regard, the US record is stunning. We already know that the US government and intelligence services failed to grasp the planning for 9/11 or to understand the realities in Iraq prior to the 2003 invasion, including the absence of nuclear weapons there. Additionally, as former Secretary of Defense Robert Gates admitted, the Untied States failed to grasp the scope of China’s military buildup, and did not realize that Russia would attack Georgia in 2008.

    More significantly, the United States missed the full nature of changes underway in the Russian military after 2008.

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