Georgia

  • Wilson and Kramer in Politico Europe: NATO: Don’t Abandon Georgia


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  • NATO Must Set a Clear Roadmap for Georgia

    NATO, created as part of Harry S. Truman’s visionary solution for a post-World War II Europe, has proven to be one of the most successful alliances in the world. A defensive alliance to protect its members from external threats, NATO has maintained peace and security on the European continent for more than six decades, paving the way for unprecedented economic development and prosperity for its members.

    The prospect of NATO membership became one of the strongest incentives for carrying out swift democratic and security sector reforms in countries in Central and Eastern Europe that aspired to join the Alliance at the end of the Cold War. Eventual NATO membership for many of these countries strengthened their security and stability as well as that of NATO itself by reducing uncertainty along NATO’s eastern flank. 

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  • NATO Summit Special Series: Ukraine

    Ukraine will likely be at the center of the NATO summit in Warsaw.
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  • NATO Summit Special Series: Georgia

    Georgia is wedged precariously between a NATO ambivalent about expansion and a giant neighbor bent on including it in its sphere of influence.
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  • Coote Quoted by Accent on the Georgian Energy Sector


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  • Benitez Interviewed by Accent on Upcoming NATO Summit


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  • Great Expectations: Aspirant Nations See NATO Enlargement as Vital to Europe’s Stability

    NATO membership for countries in the Balkans and for Georgia is crucial for the stability of Europe and will send a clear signal that Russia does not have a veto over the alliance’s enlargement plans, panelists, including officials from Macedonia and Georgia, said at the Atlantic Council on June 8.

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  • NATO Enlargement Seen About Filling Gaps

    Montenegro’s defense minister, Milica Pejanović-Đurišić, has some advice for countries aspiring to join NATO: explain to partners and friends the importance of alliance membership from a political standpoint.

    Pejanović-Đurišić is well positioned to give such advice. In December 2015, NATO extended an invitation to Montenegro to begin accession talks and become the twenty-ninth member of the alliance.

    Montenegro will do its part to explain to its partners why it is important to broaden the alliance and “fill the gaps,” said Pejanović-Đurišić. “If you geographically see what is the NATO alliance in our region now, there are a number of gaps; illogical ones,” she added.

    Pejanović-Đurišić spoke at a conference hosted by the Atlantic Council on June 8 on “The Future of NATO Enlargement and New Frontiers in European Security.”

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  • Atlantic Council Event on the Future of NATO Enlargement with Georgian, Ukrainian Officials Mentioned by the Associated Press


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  • A Saakashvili Party Comeback? Not in Georgia but Maybe in Ukraine

    Odesa Oblast Governor Mikheil Saakashvili is preparing for the launch of his political party later this year in Ukraine, but this has not prevented him from pondering a return to politics in his native Georgia. Georgian voters go to the polls on October 8 to elect a new parliament in a contest viewed as a referendum on the performance of Bidzina Ivanishvili’s Georgia Dream coalition, as well as a barometer of the public’s desire for Saakashvili to return to power.

    In the October 2012 parliamentary elections, following eight years of Saakashvili’s rule, Ivanishvili assembled a wide coalition of Saakashvili’s opponents to compete. Due to constitutional changes initiated by Saakashvili, most powers of the presidency had shifted to the prime minister following the 2012 election. This move was designed to allow Saakashvili to skirt the two-term limit for presidents and continue to rule. However, the move backfired and resulted in Ivanishvili’s Georgian Dream coalition winning a resounding victory over Saakashvili’s United National Movement (UNM).

    The following year, the Georgian Dream candidate for president won an easy victory over Saakashvili’s party’s candidate. However, a weak economy and general disappointment over perceived unfulfilled promises by the Georgian Dream coalition have led to a sharp decline in the ruling party’s popularity since then. In a recent IRI poll, 70 percent of Georgians said the country is headed in the wrong direction. At the same, other polls have put the Georgian Dream party slightly ahead of UNM.

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