Pakistan

  • Rakisits on Preserving Gains against the Taliban

    Defense News quotes South Asia Center Nonresident Senior Fellow Claude Rakisits on the importance of swiftly implementing governance plans and providing assistance to civilians as a means of preserving military gains against the Taliban in Pakistan:

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  • Khan: Bilateral Trade Potential

    Rafik Hariri Center Nonresident Senior Fellow Mohsin Khan writes for The Cipher Brief on the benefits of increased trade between India and Pakistan: 

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  • Barno and Bensahel: The Pink Flamingo on the Subcontinent: Nuclear War Between India and Pakistan

    Brent Scowcroft Center Nonresident Senior Fellows for Military Affairs and National Security Policy Dave Barno and Nora Bensahel cowrite for War on the Rocks on the tensions on the border of India and Pakistan:

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  • Engaging Youth for Pakistan’s Future

    “Yes, Pakistan is facing lots of challenges. Yes, there are flaws in our system,” said Fakiha Ali, one of the Atlantic Council’s 2015 Emerging Leaders of Pakistan. “But if we are positive and try to build something good out of all those negatives, Pakistan would definitely have a great future very soon.”

    On Oct. 26, fifteen young Pakistanis, from entrepreneurs and tech innovators to educators and activists, visited Washington under a three-week fellowship from the Atlantic Council’s South Asia Center that seeks to identify, cultivate, and support promising Pakistani youth.

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  • Rakisits on Terrorism in Pakistan

    Defense News quotes South Asia Center Nonresident Senior Fellow Claude Rakisits on the Pakistani military's efforts to combat terrorism in the country: 

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  • Empowering the Next Generation: A Conversation with Pakistan's Civil Society Leaders

    “Yes, Pakistan is facing lots of challenges. Yes, there are flaws in our system,” said Fakiha Ali, one of the Atlantic Council’s 2015 Emerging Leaders of Pakistan. “But if we are positive and try to build something good out of all those negatives, Pakistan would definitely have a great future very soon.”

    On Oct. 26, fifteen young Pakistanis, from entrepreneurs and tech innovators to educators and activists, visited Washington under a three-week fellowship from the Atlantic Council’s South Asia Center that seeks to identify, cultivate, and support promising Pakistani youth. 

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  • Nawaz on Prime Minister Sharif's Meeting with President Obama

    Bloomberg quotes South Asia Center Distinguished Fellow Shuja Nawaz on Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif's meeting with President Obama during his trip to Washington, DC and whether there will be any discussions on a deal to curtail Pakistan's nuclear program:

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  • In Afghanistan, an Opportunity for the United States to Work with China and Iran

    EU Special Representative says Islamic State’s rise has created common ground for Washington, Tehran, and Beijing

    Franz-Michael Mellbin is the European Union’s Special Representative in Afghanistan. In a wide-ranging interview with the New Atlanticist’sAshish Kumar Sen on Oct. 20, Mellbin discussed the need for a sustained US and NATO troop commitment in Afghanistan, the opportunity created by the rise of Islamic State (IS) for Washington to work with Tehran and Beijing in Afghanistan, and the necessity for Pakistan to deliver on its rhetoric to show zero tolerance toward all stripes of terrorists that occupy safe havens in its territory.

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  • A Progress Report on Pakistan's Internal Security

    On October 19, the South Asia Center hosted Ikram Sehgal, Chairman of Pathfinder Group, the largest private security company in Pakistan, along with South Asia Center Distinguished Fellow Shuja Nawaz, to discuss Pakistan’s current security situation in the wake of Army Chief Raheel Sharif’s aggressive military operation to eradicate terrorist hideouts. Bharath Gopalaswamy, South Asia Center Director, moderated the conversation, which covered Pakistan’s involvement in the Afghan peace talks, its complex relationship with the United States, and the motives that drive China to invest so heavily in Pakistan.

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  • Pakistan’s Prime Minister Heads to Washington

    But it’s the military that calls the shots in Pakistan, says former US official

    Though US President Barack Obama will meet Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif at the White House on Oct. 22 in an effort aimed at rekindling a peace process in Afghanistan, it is the military that really calls the shots in the South Asian nation, Vali Nasr, a former Obama administration official said Oct. 16.

    “Nawaz Sharif’s administration has fallen into the same pattern as [former] President [Asif Ali] Zardari, which means that there is a very stable civilian façade that actually does not make any critical decisions, particularly on security issues that [are] very obviously delegated to the military,” Nasr, who served as Special Adviser to Obama’s Special Representative for Afghanistan and Pakistan from 2009 to 2011, said in a panel discussion at the Atlantic Council.

    When it comes to Pakistan’s Afghan, Indian, and general security policies, the “real decisionmakers” are in the military, specifically Army Chief Gen. Raheel Sharif, said Nasr. “That’s the new normal in Pakistan: No coups, civilian governments that will end their terms but basically make no waves.”

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