Crimea

  • Yastenyuk: Crimea "Is Our Territory"

    The Washington Post details Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk's visit to the Atlantic Council:

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  • Ukraine's Leader Offers "Equal Partnership” with Russia; Praises US Response

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    March 12, 2014

    WASHINGTON – Ukraine’s Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk offered to negotiate an “equal partnership” with Russia if it ends its invasion of Crimea, and praised the Western response to the crisis following his talks at the White House.

    “I would like to reiterate that we still want to have a free, equal partnership... with Russia. And we can’t do [that] having a military incursion,” Yatsenyuk said at the Atlantic Council Wednesday. “The best strategy is to sit and to negotiate.... The best approach for Russia is just to stop, and calm down.”
  • Ukrainian Leaders Gather Support in Washington

    On his fourteenth day as Ukraine's interim prime minister, Arseniy Yatsenyuk hustled through Washington today to gather support for his country against Russia's invasion of Crimea. He visited the White House, the State Department, Congresss, the Atlantic Council, and the International Monetary Fund. At the White House, President Obama welcomed Yatsenyuk by commending the Ukrainian people on their courage in the face of the Russian assault, a national economic and debt crisis, and other challenges.
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  • Yatsenyuk: IMF Loan "Not a Sweet Candy"

    Bloomberg Businessweek covers Arseniy Yastenyuk's visit to the Atlantic Council:

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  • Ukraine Leader Offers “Partnership” With Russia if it Exits Crimea

    Ukraine’s Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk offered to negotiate an “equal partnership” with Russia if it ends its invasion of Crimea, and praised the Western response to the crisis following his talks today at the White House.

    “I would like to reiterate that we still want to have a free, equal partnership... with Russia. And we can’t do [that] having a military incursion,” Yatsenyuk said at the Atlantic Council. “The best strategy is to sit and to negotiate.... The best approach for Russia is just to stop, and calm down.”

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  • NYT Reports on Yatsenyuk Visit

    The New York Times covers Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk's address at the Atlantic Council:

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  • Wilson: Obama Working Hard on Ukraine

    The Daily Telegraph quotes Atlantic Council Executive VP Damon Wilson on President Obama's reaction to the crisis in Ukraine:

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  • Belarus to Ask Russia for Warplanes in Response to NATO Drills

    From AFP:  Belarussian President Alexander Lukashenko said Wednesday he would ask Russia to station up to 15 jets in his country in response to NATO's moves over the Ukraine crisis.
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  • Putin’s Failure in Crimea

    Five Ways the Kremlin Has Weakened Itself at Home and Abroad

    Russian President Vladimir Putin and his supporters in Moscow and the West are explaining and justifying his invasion of Ukraine’s Crimea in various ways and celebrating the divisions and weaknesses of the West that it has highlighted, but in every case, they are treating it as a geopolitical victory for the Kremlin. They could not be more wrong.

    There are five reasons for what may seem to many a counter-intuitive conclusion, each of which must be kept in mind in the face of the bombast coming out of Moscow and the apologetics in some Western capitals for this latest example of Russian bad behavior. [They also affect] the ensuing arguments for not taking serious actions that would inflict a real punishment on Putin -- even and often because none contemplated could immediately reverse what he has done.            

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  • Crimea: Putin's Afghanistan?

    As President Vladimir Putin seems to be finalizing Russian suzerainty over Crimea, capitols in Europe and Washington are struggling to find ways to reverse this land grab.  Unfortunately, short of using force---a response no one considers sane---for the short term, the cupboard of options is relatively bare.  Canceling visas, boycotting the G-8 meeting in Sochi, expelling Russia from the G-8 and other sanctions are hardly pinpricks on Putin’s thick hide.  Of course, taking aim at Russia’s central bank and hastening a run on the ruble would hurt and have broader secondary and tertiary effects such as cramping business or forcing a cut-off of energy to the West.
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