Crimea

  • Amid Chaos, a Humiliating and Dangerous Defeat for Ukraine

    In Russia’s takeover of southeast Ukraine – which President Vladimir Putin is characterizing as a recovery of old Russian provinces lost in the 1920s – this week’s ineffectiveness and weakness of Ukraine’s government and armed forces are visible almost everywhere.

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  • Slocombe: Send US Military Aid to Ukraine, But Expect Battlefield Results to Take Time

    The United States should provide military aid to Ukraine but should understand that the strength it lends the government in Kyiv will be more political than military, at least in the short run, says Former Undersecretary of Defense Walter Slocombe. As the Obama administration has limited its assistance to "non-lethal" supplies such as rations and clothing, US leaders and analysts, including Senator John McCain, former ambassador to Ukraine John Herbst and others, have called for greater US help, including weapons and high-tech equipment. Slocombe, a director of the Atlantic Council, says in an interview that US officials "ought to be realistic," noting that provision of sophisticated systems also will require training – and therefore a passage of time – to be militarily effective.
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  • Putin Asserts Right to Use Force in Eastern Ukraine

    President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia emphasized on Thursday that the upper chamber of the Russian Parliament had authorized him to use military force if necessary in eastern Ukraine, and also stressed Russia's historical claim to the territory
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  • Head of NATO Says Ukraine Only Part of Putin's Ambitions

    "I see Ukraine and Crimea in a bigger context," Mr. [NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh] Rasmussen says. "I see this as an element in a pattern, and it's driven by President Putin's strong desire to restore Russian greatness
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  • Gates: US Response to Russia's Use of Force Likely to Lead to 'More Crises and Conflict'

    I think an actual invasion would be a very critical matter and a source of great concern. But I think — I think it's a concern for the same reason that the invasion of Crimea or the seizure of Crimea is a concern.
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  • After Russian Invasion of Crimea, Alliance Must Deter Incursions into NATO Members

    "An aggressive, revanchist power," in the Estonian leader's words, makes the unthinkable thinkable. "We were already caught off guard with Crimea," he [Estonian President Toomas Hendrik Ilves] says.
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  • US and Europe Can Ramp Up Their Pressures on Russia

    Both Europe and the United States are designing broader sets of economic sanctions against Russia over its assaults on Ukraine says the Atlantic Council's Fran Burwell. Like the Obama administration, the European Union is considering a further phase of sanctions that will likely include restrictions on Russian banks doing business in Europe, and on European companies' sale of services to Russia's oil and gas industries, said Burwell, who directs the Council's Transatlantic Relations Program.
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  • Senate Testimony: Transatlantic Security Challenges in Central & Eastern Europe

    Council Senior Fellow Ian Brzezinski will testify before a panel of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, recommending policies dealing with the crisis in Ukraine. The hearing starts at 3:00 p.m. The lineup of panelists is below. We will make the video and Ian Brzezinski's testimony as prepared for delivery available on this page as soon as the hearing starts.
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  • Brzezinski: Putin Can Withstand Sanctions

    CNBC quotes Brent Scowcroft Center Senior Fellow Ian Brzezinski on Russia's ability to withstand economic sanctions in the wake of the invasion of Crimea:

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  • Why We Can Play the Long Game on Russia

    With the benefit of hindsight, the Russian annexation of Crimea shouldn’t have been a great surprise: it has been obvious to those who chose to look that for most of the last twenty years, that Russian president Vladimir Putin never fully accepted the USSR’s demise. Now, as the West agonizes over another possible irredentist feint—possibly in Ukraine proper or in Transnistria—the United States and its allies need to take a deep breath and consider the long game.

    By the end of March, some accouterments of post-Soviet sovereignty had changed. The peninsula in dispute switched flags and currencies. But despite epochal foreboding, few lives had been lost; with Russian pride assuaged, the remainder of Ukraine was lurching into the European Union’s embrace—barring a Putin effort to destabilize it. The issue kicking off the crisis in the first place—Ukraine’s edging towards the EU—had now given Eurasia another tilt towards Mother Europe.

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