Latin America

  • SPOTLIGHT: Brazil's Anti-Corruption Fight: What Lies Ahead?

    On October 28, Brazilians elected Jair Messias Bolsonaro as the next president of the republic, following a hyper-polarized and contentious election. The impetus, in part, for the frustration: Brazilians’ anger with rampant corruption.

    In this Spotlight, we ask: What are the five most important areas Brazil’s new administration must focus on to effectively fight corruption?


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  • Marczak in Real Clear World: We Need to Pay Attention to Chaos in Venezuela


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  • "The Future Looks Dark" as Maduro Begins Second Term in Venezuela

    As the Venezuelan economy continues to deteriorate, the international community needs to work towards “a situation in which conditions can improve in the country and Venezuelans will no longer have to leave their homeland,” according to Jason Marczak, the director of the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center. But, Marczak warned, “That is not going to be possible under a Maduro regime.”

    Nicolás Maduro was inaugurated as president of Venezuela for a second term on January 10, after elections that more than 50 countries around the world condemned as illegitimate. The United States, Canada, the European Union, and most of Latin America’s major economies have refused to recognize Maduro’s election and are undertaking a sustained external pressure campaign against the regime.


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  • MADURO: Fraud and Six Years of Failures

    New Venezuela Infographic
    DOWNLOAD_FULL_INFOGRAPHIC.pdf

    January 10 is both the start of Nicolás Maduro’s second term in office as well as a day to reinforce the lack of democratic conditions that led to his declaring victory and what is at stake. Today, one day earlier, the Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center releases infographic that depict the illegitimacy of this new term, Maduro’s first-term results, and options for the road ahead.

    Although the 2018 electoral event was not recognized by the international community, Maduro has been unwavering in his quest for power. His authoritarianism and the schemes enriching high-level government officials and members of the military persist despite a ramp-up of international sanctions and growing internal and external pressure.


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  • Jair Bolsonaro's First One Hundred Days

    Read the Interactive Report

    In this Spotlight, we ask: What are the four of the top action items President Bolsonaro might prioritize in his first one hundred days in office.


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  • SPOTLIGHT: Jair Bolsonaro's First One Hundred Days

    In one of the most consequential presidential elections in the country’s recent history, Brazilians elected Jair Messias Bolsonaro their next president on October 28, 2018, after two highly contested rounds of voting that left Brazilians deeply divided.

    In this Spotlight, we ask: What are four of the top issues President Jair Bolsonaro might prioritize in his first one hundred days in office?


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  • Marczak in USA Today: US Should Welcome Mexico's Bold New Steps to Help Migrants and Central America


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  • Five Takeaways from Latin America’s Presidential Elections in 2018

    In 2018, the three largest countries in Latin America—Colombia, Mexico, and Brazil—elected new heads of state. Colombia voted in its youngest president, Iván Duque; Mexico elected left-wing populist Andrés Manuel López Obrador (AMLO); and Brazil chose former army captain and right-wing candidate Jair Bolsonaro. As the three leaders kick off their respective mandates, and as other elections shape up in the region, the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center highlights five overarching trends that warrant a closer look and that are likely to affect the region over the next five years.

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  • Wayne Testifies Before Senate Committee on the Judiciary on Border Security and Us-Mexico Economic Ties


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  • Can Brazil’s Relationship With Iran Survive a New Administration?

    The trade and economic partnership between Iran and Brazil has expanded in recent years and was slated to grow even further after the completion of the Iran nuclear dealin 2015. But questions are being raised about this relationship after the victory of President-elect Jair Bolsonaro.

    Brazil is Iran’s seventh-largest trade partner and by far its most important economic interlocutor in South America. On November 15, a Brazilian vessel arrived at Chabahar, Iran’s only ocean port, carrying 72,000 tons of bulk corn from Brazil.  A year ago, a Brazilian ship, the Living, carried 66,000 tons of sugar into Chabahar.

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