EgyptSource

With the many legal challenges facing Egypt’s coming parliament, even if it is not dissolved by a ruling of the Supreme Constitutional Court, it may still be dissolved by the president. The political system in Egypt’s Constitution is a distorted one, based on the consolidation of the powers of the president at the expense of the other branches of government, and of the parliament in particular. Indeed, true authority in Egypt is not exercised by the parliament as a representative of the will of the people; rather, it is the president who holds supreme authority.

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The Egyptian cabinet issued an appendix to an earlier decree on Wednesday regarding the country’s political borders and tightening military control on the border with Libya. The addition to the November 2014 decree requires residents who moved to the western border city of Salloum after 1967 to obtain a written military clearance. 

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There have been various legal reasons used to challenge the constitutionality of the laws organizing the upcoming parliamentary elections. For the most part, these reasons are based on controversial legal articles, many of which were rejected by a large segment of the political forces in Egypt.

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According to a timeframe put in place by the High Elections Commission (HEC) in January, a new Egyptian parliament should be elected and convened by mid-May, 2015, at the latest. However, a study of the current situation, particularly in legal and constitutional terms—irrespective of the political context and electoral alliances that may be formed—indicates that the parliament will face a number of major obstacles.

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US lawmakers did not raise any objections to a proposed $1.3 billion military assistance package for Egypt during two days of hearings with Secretary of State John Kerry. Their silence is the clearest sign yet that Congress is lining up behind President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi as he takes on the Islamic State and other Islamists. 

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Egypt's Supreme Constitutional Court (SCC) adjourned on Tuesday the trial determining the constitutionality of the parliamentary elections laws to March 1, as a verdict is expected to be returned next session.

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"How could I go to the Coptic Cathedral to extend my condolences when the Egyptian army hasn't avenged the attacks?" asked Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi in a pre-recorded speech broadcast Sunday night.

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Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi has signed off on an anti-terrorism law that gives authorities more sweeping powers to ban groups on charges ranging from harming national unity to disrupting public order. The law’s ten articles focus on defining terrorist entities, listing such groups and bodies, and stipulating the legal processes for appealing these lists. 

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Over the past week, the village of al-Aour in the governorate of Minya—home to thirteen of the twenty Coptic Egyptian victims killed by the Islamic State (ISIS) in Libya—has been transformed. The once obscure village has become a site for official delegations and mourners to visit, and offer condolences and support to the bereaved families of the victims. This influx of visitors is new for al-Aour.

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Between agony and happiness, the village of al-Aour in the Egyptian governorate of Minya lost thirteen of its residents to a brutal death. Those thirteen were among the twenty Egyptian Christians recently beheaded by the Islamic State (ISIS) in Libya.

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