EgyptSource

Forty students were expelled from the police academy after “investigations by the security forces and the national security proved that they belong to the Muslim Brotherhood,” said interior ministry spokesperson Hani Abdel-Latif on Tuesday.

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Egypt’s president Abdel Fattah al-Sisi issued a decree on Monday to create a new police rank with arrest powers, the move will increase the number of law enforcement staff. 

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Egypt has a youth problem. According to official statistics, 31 percent of the population is under the age of 14, and 24 percent of the population is between 18 and 29. Integrating them into the social and political fabric of society is expected to be challenging, especially given the raised expectations of the revolution. Egypt also has an education problem. According to official statistics, 25 percent of the population over 10 years old is illiterate. According to UNICEF, student participation is generally not encouraged by teachers, and less than ten percent of schools meet national standards for quality education.

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The Egyptian prosecution referred on Saturday 439 defendants to the military judiciary over violence which followed the deadly dispersal of two pro-Mohamed Morsi camps in August 2013.

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Egyptian president Abdel Fattah al Sisi approved a new terrorism law earlier this month. While disturbing, the law is not surprising when viewed in the context of Egypt’s consistent rhetoric of its war against terror. With the Egyptian militant organization Ansar Bayt al-Maqdis recently pledging allegiance to the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS), the threat is real. The recently passed law, however, comes at a high cost.

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The Mansoura Misdemeanor Court has accepted the appeal submitted by prosecutors in the case in which a doctor brought to trial on charges of Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) was acquitted.

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The long-term spending bill that Congress is expected to adopt this week would allow the State Department to resume military aid to Egypt despite ongoing concerns with the country's human rights record.

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Who killed the protesters? This question was the headline of almost every major Egyptian newspaper, after charges against former president Hosni Mubarak were dropped, and his interior minister Habib al-Adly, and six ministry aides were cleared of charges in what was known as “the trial of the century.” In addition to corruption charges, Mubarak was on trial for his role in the death of hundreds of civilians during the January 2011 uprising. The question is asked at times seriously, and at others mockingly. It’s asked by those who believe the verdict is fair and those who question the judiciary’s independence.

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Egyptians wishing to travel to Turkey or Iraq are now required to get security approval from passport control authorities. General Ayman Hamed, chief of the media bureau for the interior ministry said that the decision came earlier this week during “exceptional timing" for the region.

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The Egyptian government spent much of this week denying the authenticity of a series of leaked alleged conversations between senior military aides. According to the leaks, official records were tampered with to show that former president Mohamed Morsi was not illegally imprisoned after his removal by the army on July 3, 2013. They allege that Morsi was held in a military facility, rather than an interior ministry facility, a legal violation since he is being tried by a civilian court. However, the recordings, aired on December 4 by a pro-Muslim Brotherhood, Turkey-based satellite television channel, Mekameleen, are unlikely to change the outcome of Morsi’s many trials in which he faces serious charges, most of which are punishable by death. They have also done little to garner sympathy for the Brotherhood with a public that seems to largely support the harsh security crackdown on its members.

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