Programs

The Global Business & Economics Program works to build upon and strengthen the already deep economic integration between Europe and the United States as well as promote transatlantic leadership in the global economy.

The latest pieces from Econographics

Wed, Aug 28, 2019

US-EU Auto Tariffs: What’s at Stake?

Escalating trade tensions between the world’s major economies are widely considered the greatest threat to the global economy’s health. Following the White House’s cancellation of its threatened tariffs on all Mexican imports on June 7, attention swiftly turned back to the brewing US-China trade war. This edition of the EconoGraphic, however, puts the focus on how US tariffs on cars and car parts might disrupt transatlantic trade flow.

EconoGraphics by OLE MOEHR | GRAPHICS BY MARIANNA ASLUND, NICK BROWN, ANDREW LASCALEIA

Economy & Business European Union

Fri, Aug 9, 2019

Breaking Down France’s Digital Tax

n July, France’s parliament ratified a new law to tax big digital tech firms making it the first country to pass a tax law of this manner. Paris’ new tax scheme triggered criticism from the Trump Administration and is further complicating the transatlantic relationship. This edition of the EconoGraphic explains the motivation behind taxing digital technology firms more aggressively, the way that the French tax will work, and the potential impacts and response to the tax.

EconoGraphics by BY ANDREW LASCALEIA, EDITED BY OLE MOEHR | GRAPHICS BY MARIANNA ASLUND AND ANDREW LASCALEIA

Economy & Business Financial Regulation

Tue, Jul 23, 2019

My Way or the Huawei: 5G at the Center of US-China Strategic Competition

On July 22, President Trump met with a group of major tech CEOs to discuss the easing of some restrictions on US companies supplying high-tech parts to Chinese telecommunications company Huawei. In May, the US Commerce Department banned US companies from selling any products to Huawei. The Chinese company’s position as the world’s leading provider of 5G technology has made it a focal point of the escalating great power competition between China and the United States. This edition of the EconoGraphic explains the US government’s move to blacklist Huawei, outlines the ban’s potential costs, and describes why US allies are conflicted about banning Huawei.

EconoGraphics by OLE MOEHR | GRAPHICS BY MARIANNA ASLUND, NICK BROWN, ANDREW LASCALEIA

China Economy & Business

Experts

Content

Tue, Jan 21, 2020

The economic battleground between China and the United Kingdom

The importance of the Shanghai-London Stock Connect suspension will depend on whether additional policy moves targeting large British firms will follow. In terms of tangible effects, this event causes little economic disruption, but is probably the most symbolically important use of Chinese financial sanctions thus far.

New Atlanticist by Michael Greenwald

China Financial Regulation

Thu, Jan 16, 2020

The effect of US sanctions on the Iran-Iraq alliance

The potential sanctions against Iraq under consideration now could damage the United States’ goals in that country and would only embolden Iran’s position—the exact scenario that US policy has tried to avoid. Economic countermeasures, such as restrictions to Iraq’s Federal Reserve accounts—could not only cede economic clout within Iraq to Tehran but could also have significant impact on the US dollar's global position.

New Atlanticist by Michael Greenwald

Economic Sanctions

Wed, Jan 15, 2020

Stemming Maduro’s Illicit Activities: What’s Next After the Jan. 5 Elections?

Beyond hyperinflation and human rights abuses, the Maduro regime has diversified its criminal portfolio and profited from a host of illicit activities, from drug smuggling to illegal mining.

Event Recap by Pablo Reynoso

Corruption Crisis Management

Wed, Jan 15, 2020

Tran joins Yahoo to discuss impact of US-China trade deal

In the News by Atlantic Council

China Economy & Business

Wed, Jan 15, 2020

Congressional Hearing – “U.S.-Iran Tensions: Implications for Homeland Security”

The Committee meeting examined the homeland security implications of the recent escalation in US-Iran tensions in the wake of the killing of Qasem Soleimani. Witnesses were given time to present opening statements to address possible retaliation followed by questions posed by committee members. Nonresident Senior Fellow Thomas S. Warrick presented four ways in which Iran threatens the homeland: terrorism, cyber-attacks, disinformation, and influence operations. Warrick underscored the imminent threat posed by Iranian cyber-attacks, “Mr. Chairman, the possibility of a terrorist attack by Iran here in the homeland is that, a possibility, but cyber-attacks are a certainty.”

Congressional Relations by

Defense Policy Digital Policy

Wed, Jan 15, 2020

At the beginning of 2020, what are the global risks and growth prospects for the Euro Area?

After the high real growth of the EA in 2015 (averaging slightly more than 2% per year), growth in 2019-20 has been downgraded as several risks materialized. Furthermore, the balance of persistent global or domestic risks remain negative even if less than last year.

New Atlanticist by Marc-Olivier Strauss-Kahn

European Union International Markets

Mon, Jan 13, 2020

Spotlight: Alejandro Giammattei’s first 100 days

Guatemala will begin a new chapter today with the presidential inauguration of Alejandro Giammattei Falla. At the center of the incoming pro-business administration: ushering in a new era of economic growth and job creation. With 59 percent of Guatemalans living in poverty, Central America’s largest and most populous country is also one the poorest and most unequal nations in Latin America. What are the priorities of President Giammattei to address such longstanding challenges? With the termination of the CICIG and ever-present migration challenges, can President Giammattei improve the living conditions for the millions of Guatemalans who seek a better future in their own country?

Issue Brief by María Fernanda Pérez Argüello and Domingo Sadurní

Latin America Migration

Mon, Jan 13, 2020

Trump’s bilateral trade deals are undermining the global trading system

Overall, the three early 2020 agreements have started to transform the multilateral rule-based system into a largely bilaterally managed, outcome-based system. RTAs and their new practices accelerate the fragmentation of the world trading system into numerous trading zones with different overlapping memberships and trade coverage, tariffs, quotas, and quantitative trade targets, plus other rules such as local content and country of origin requirements as well as dispute settlement processes.

New Atlanticist by Hung Tran

China European Union

Mon, Jan 13, 2020

China’s support for the Maduro regime: Enduring or fleeting?

As Venezuela’s biggest creditor, China is carrying the burden of Venezuela’s economic collapse. The PRC has become increasingly aware of this unsustainable situation, and, behind closed doors, has been in communications with the interim government. Back in February, Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Geng Shuang said that China is open to working with a different government to ensure payment for the loans-for-oil deals. Strictly speaking, China’s relationship with the South American country is transactional, not ideological.

New Atlanticist by Cristina Guevara

China International Markets

Fri, Jan 10, 2020

Chemali quoted in CNN on US imposed sanctions on Iran

In the News by Atlantic Council

Economic Sanctions Iran