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New Atlanticist by Dan Peleschuk

Nov 18, 2021

‘Hungary is not a democracy anymore,’ says opposition leader

New Atlanticist by Dan Peleschuk

Péter Márki-Zay, an engineer-turned-politician who now leads Hungary's opposition, joined the Atlantic Council for a discussion about the future of his country.

Central Europe Corruption

New Atlanticist by András Simonyi

Aug 27, 2021

Echoes of Hungary: What a former ambassador sees in the Afghanistan debacle

New Atlanticist by András Simonyi

There is a sad correlation between the West’s failure to help Hungary and the events unfolding in Afghanistan.

Afghanistan Conflict

Blog Post

Aug 10, 2021

State of the Order: Assessing July 2021

Blog Post

The State of the Order breaks down the month's most important events impacting the democratic world order.

Americas China

New Atlanticist by Piotr Trabinski, Daniel Palotai, Liviu Voinea, Tsvetan Manchev, and Nils Vaikla

Nov 23, 2020

Building bridges across the Three Seas

New Atlanticist by Piotr Trabinski, Daniel Palotai, Liviu Voinea, Tsvetan Manchev, and Nils Vaikla

The CESEE countries would be justified by gradually moving away from indiscriminate policy support to better targeted strategic policy resource allocation and growth-enhancing infrastructure projects.

Central Europe Eastern Europe

Report by John Blocher

Nov 22, 2020

Unexpected competition: A US strategy to keep its Central and Eastern European allies as allies in an era of great-power competition

Report by John Blocher

As China and Russia make inroads with traditional US allies in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE), the United States is faced with unexpected competition. To keep these US allies as allies for years to come, policymakers should heed the roadmap offered in this strategy paper, which focuses on the case study of Hungary to recommend ways to deepen alliances with CEE nations.

Central Europe Defense Policy

New Atlanticist by Atlantic Council

Nov 13, 2020

How a Biden presidency could change US relations with the rest of the world

New Atlanticist by Atlantic Council

We asked experts from around the Atlantic Council to preview what the election of Joe Biden as US president will mean for countries, big and small, all across the world. Here’s a quick spin around the globe as we preview what lies ahead for US foreign policy under Joe Biden:

Africa East Asia

New Atlanticist by Daniel Fried

Jun 9, 2020

In Central Europe, a nationalist bullet dodged

New Atlanticist by Daniel Fried

Many in the region expected the 100th anniversary of Trianon to be a blow up. It could be yet. But around the actual anniversary, it was a dog that did not bark: the significance was in what wasn’t said, in nationalist pandering avoided and confrontation dodged, and positive gestures recognized.

Central Europe Hungary

New Atlanticist by Bálint Ablonczy

Apr 17, 2020

Life in Hungary during COVID-19

New Atlanticist by Bálint Ablonczy

It remains to be seen what effect the coronavirus will yet have on the Hungarian people. So far, it seems, Hungary is far from the worst that was thought possible.

Coronavirus Hungary

Borscht Belt by Atlantic Council Eurasia Center

Apr 17, 2020

Why strongmen love the coronavirus

Borscht Belt by Atlantic Council Eurasia Center

As the COVID-19 pandemic sweeps across the globe, autocratic governments are finding the crisis to be a useful pretext for strengthening their rule and tightening their grips.

Coronavirus Corruption

New Atlanticist by Denise Forsthuber and Daniel Fried

Apr 7, 2020

Addressing Hungary’s coronavirus emergency legislation

New Atlanticist by Denise Forsthuber and Daniel Fried

Many in Europe and the United States who consider themselves friends of Hungary have struggled over what to do with what can be increasingly interpreted as an authoritarian drift in that country. Hungary was one of the early leaders of Central Europe’s democratic transformation after its overthrow of communist rule in 1989; this is the tradition we would prefer to be celebrating today. Instead, we struggle to find a way forward.

Coronavirus European Union