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Thu, Sep 19, 2019

Secondary sanctions’ implications and the transatlantic relationship

The term secondary sanctions provokes strong reactions from allies and markets. Due to the power of the US dollar, breadth of the US market, and dominance of the US financial system, even the threat of secondary sanctions prompts many non-US companies to change their behavior to avoid the risk of such sanctions. Although this approach has furthered US policies, it has resulted in transatlantic political divergence and enhanced compliance uncertainty among private sector actors.

Issue Brief by Samantha Sultoon & Justine Walker

China Economic Sanctions

Thu, Sep 19, 2019

North Korea is trying to find a way to keep the lights on

Since the collapse of the USSR in 1991, the North Korean regime had to devise a way to meet its ever-growing energy demand without benefaction. But when all the options present their own set of flaws, the best answer seems still to be elusive.

EnergySource by Halley Posner

East Asia Energy Markets & Governance

Tue, Sep 17, 2019

Great Power Competition in Southeast Europe

In the past decade, the United States and the European Union (EU) became more ambivalent about our commitments in the Western Balkans. Moscow and Beijing, sensing an opening, have become more determined in their efforts to gain influence and leverage in the region.

New Atlanticist by Damon Wilson

China Russia

Mon, Sep 16, 2019

Ullman in Washington Post: In Afghanistan negotiations, we must include our allies

Uncategorized by Atlantic Council

Afghanistan NATO

Sat, Sep 14, 2019

Abu Dhabi dispatch: The great Sino-US decoupling

Delegates at this year’s World Energy Congress in Abu Dhabi UAE continued to worry about the US-Chinese trade war. At the same time, however, they were shifting more focus to the more momentous and generational event of a US-Chinese economic decoupling.

Inflection Points by Frederick Kempe

China Energy Markets & Governance

Thu, Sep 12, 2019

A potential path forward for Hong Kong?

Beijing needs to give the Hong Kong government "some space" to effectively address the concerns of its citizens, former US general consul to Hong Kong Kurt Tong said.

New Atlanticist by David A. Wemer

China Rule of Law

Mon, Sep 9, 2019

Recommendations on 5G and National Security

TO: National Security Community of the United States, its Allies, and Partners FROM: General James L. Jones, U.S. Marine Corps (Ret.) DATE: February 11, 2019 SUBJECT: Recommendations on 5G and National Security China’s aggressive attempt to subsidize the development of global 5G networks as a tool of Beijing’s geopolitical and economic power requires an urgent […]

Strategic Insights Memo by James L. Jones

China Security & Defense

Thu, Sep 5, 2019

Purveying arms through carrot and stick

US arms sales to India have risen more than fivefold over the last five years and now account for 12 per cent of India’s defense imports, according to a recent study by the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI).

New Atlanticist by Sarosh Bana

Defense Industry India

Tue, Sep 3, 2019

US-Taliban negotiations: How to avoid rushing to failure

A major troop withdrawal must be contingent on a final peace. The initial US drawdown should not go so far or so fast that the Taliban believe that they can achieve military victory. In that case, they will not make compromises for peace with other Afghan political forces.

New Atlanticist by James Dobbins, Robert P. Finn, Ronald E. Neumann, William Wood, John Negroponte, E. Anthony Wayne, Ryan Crocker, James Cunningham, Hugo Llorens

Afghanistan Democratic Transitions

Sat, Aug 31, 2019

Is Germany going soft on China?

If Germany gets its way, it would be the strongest sign to date that Europe is charting its own course in its ties with China, ignoring pressure from hawks in the Trump administration to pare back economic links.

New Atlanticist by Noah Barkin

China Germany