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Thu, Mar 19, 2020

Ambassadors call for global cooperation to meet coronavirus challenge

While societies around the world struggle to contain the spread of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), political leaders must continue to collaborate on solutions to mitigate the public health and economic effects of the virus.

New Atlanticist by David A. Wemer

Coronavirus East Asia

Mon, Mar 9, 2020

Time for the European Union to reassert itself in the UN Security Council

Brexit has not only cost the European Union (EU) one of its members, but also a coveted permanent seat at the UN Security Council (UNSC). The UK and France often provided a reliable tandem for the European Union at the UNSC, but now London and Paris may start to diverge more prominently, since the UK is no longer obliged to coordinate its positions with EU member states through Article 34 of the Lisbon Treaty. To retain its influence and maintain its global geopolitical ambitions, the EU should look for another permanent seat on the UNSC.

New Atlanticist by Peter Pindják

European Union United Nations

Thu, Feb 27, 2020

Max Brooks in the Washington Post: China barred my dystopian novel about how its system enables epidemics

In the News by Atlantic Council

China Civil Society

Wed, Feb 19, 2020

Hudson joins Voice of America to discuss Sudan’s decision to transfer al-Bashir to the ICC

In the News by Atlantic Council

Africa Democratic Transitions

Tue, Feb 11, 2020

Hudson quoted in the Washington Post on Sudan’s cooperation with the ICC

In the News by Atlantic Council

Africa International Organizations

Mon, Jan 27, 2020

PACE risks becoming a watchdog with no bite

Ukraine's return to the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe is in danger of being overshadowed by efforts to make it much more difficult to impose sanctions similar to the measures aimed at Russia over the 2014 invasion of Ukraine. Will Europe's human rights watchdog lose its bite?

UkraineAlert by Oleksiy Goncharenko

Europe & Eurasia International Organizations

Sun, Jan 19, 2020

From Versailles to Davos: Confronting historic perils

What world leaders coming to Davos know is that history’s course is up for grabs again. Major power competition is heating up, inflamed by a systemic contest between democratic and state capitalism. The world is awash with uncertainty about how new technologies and rising environmental threats could remake our world. The international order of rules and institutions that the U.S. and its partners constructed after World War II is faltering and ill-equipped to navigate these challenges.

Inflection Points by Frederick Kempe

International Norms International Organizations

Thu, Jan 9, 2020

Democracy under siege: Advancing cooperation and common values in the Indo-Pacific

“Democracy under Siege: Advancing Cooperation and Common Values in the Indo-Pacific” examines challenges and opportunities for advancing cooperation and common values in the Indo-Pacific as the region faces an increasing challenge from China.

Issue Brief by Dr. Kharis Templeman

Australia China

Wed, Nov 20, 2019

Ullman in UPI: What if decades of American influence were historical aberration?

In the News by Atlantic Council

Conflict Crisis Management

Wed, Oct 30, 2019

Transforming the international order: US leadership or bust

While many nations throughout the globe have seen new levels of peace and prosperity under the rules-based order that the United States and its allies built in the wake of the Second World War, “not everybody accepts those principles and values that have been the foundation of that system,” according to former US National Security Advisor Stephen J. Hadley.

New Atlanticist by Jasper Gilardi

China International Financial Institutions