The Revolutionary Path to Reform for Ukraine's National Police

December 15, 2015 - 4:00 pm

Atlantic Council, 1030 15th Street NW, 12th Floor (West Tower)
Washington, DC

The Revolutionary Path to Reform for Ukraine's National Police

A conversation with:
Khatia Dekanoidze
Ukrainian National Police

Moderated by:
John Herbst
Dinu Patriciu Eurasia Center
Atlantic Council

Among the many reforms underway in Ukraine, the effort to modernize the country’s police force stands out as a particular success. Ukraine’s police has had a reputation for corruption since Ukraine’s independence. Following the Euromaidan revolution, the Ministry of Internal Affairs with support from the US Department of State, replaced Kyiv’s police force in July 2015. Odesa and Lviv followed suit in August 2015 with plans to carry out similar reforms across Ukraine’s major cities. Since the reform began, 4,800 new police officers have joined the police force, and public support for the new police force remains high. The success of the police reforms signals that rapid and radical reforms are possible to achieve in a short time.

The newly-appointed Chief of the Ukrainian National Police, Khatia Dekanoidze, played a critical role in launching Ukraine’s police reform . Ms. Dekanoidze will join the Atlantic Council to discuss her strategy to restructure, reform, and train the police force, as well as her plans to capitalize on the success and transform Ukraine’s police forces. Prior to her appointment, she served as an adviser to the Minister of Internal Affairs Arsen Avakov, playing a critical role in launching Ukraine’s patrol police reform. Ms. Dekanoidze previously held several positions with the Georgian government, including Minister of Education and Science, Head of the Ministry of Internal Affairs’ Police Academy, and Political Counselor at the Georgian Embassy in the United States. She also served as the Head of the Social Studies Faculty at the Caucasus University. Ms. Dekanoidze graduated from Tbilisi State University with a degree in international relations and law in 1999.

We hope you can join us for this important and timely discussion.

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