As the heads of state and government from the twenty-nine NATO member states gather in Brussels on July 11 and 12, the Atlantic Council will co-host NATO Engages: The Brussels Summit Dialogue—the official high-profile outreach effort for the Alliance’s summit.

Read More

The leaders of Ethiopia and Eritrea on July 9 signed a declaration ending the state of war between the two countries.

The summit between Eritrean President Isaias Afewerki and Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed in the Eritrean capital, Asmara, on July 9 marked the first time that the neighbors’ heads of state have met in nearly two decades.

Read More

Women Critical to Countering Violent Extremism

Female suicide bombers carried out more than 230 deadly attacks between 1985 and 2008, according to research conducted by Mia Bloom, the author of Bombshell: Women and Terrorism. Female terrorists, including the Chechen Black Widows, and members of the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE) in Sri Lanka and the Irish Republican Army (IRA), were responsible for about a quarter of all terrorist attacks in that period. And yet, women have been largely ignored when it comes to addressing the challenge of terrorism.
British Prime Minister Theresa May’s government was engulfed in turmoil on July 9 as she lost two senior Cabinet members over her plans for a soft Brexit.

Within a span of twenty-four hours, David Davis resigned as Brexit secretary and Boris Johnson as foreign secretary. If forty-eight members of Parliament write letters of no confidence, May will be forced to face a vote of no confidence.

Read More

Open letter to their Excellencies the gathered heads of state and government of the NATO nations from the GLOBSEC NATO Adaptation Team

Read More

You’ve likely never heard of the Parsley Island crisis, sixteen years ago this week in the narrow waters between Morocco and Spain. So, it’s unlikely you’ve considered what its peaceful resolution says about the stakes involved the next few days in President Trump’s meeting first in Brussels with NATO leaders and thereafter with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Helsinki.

Read More

NATO must overcome two forms of discord—US-European and intra-European—in order to ensure the future health and effectiveness of the Alliance. It is not enough to hope for mere platitudes of unity at NATO’s summit in Brussels on July 11 and 12, sentiments that European leaders may not receive from the US president.

At last year’s “mini-summit,” US President Donald J. Trump publicly berated European allies for not spending 2 percent of GDP on defense—a goal that the allies agreed at their Wales Summit in 2014 to meet “within a decade.” This year, the path toward a successful summit appears equally unharmonious.

Read More

In a few days, US President Donald J. Trump will meet with his fellow heads of state and government from across the NATO alliance in Brussels, Belgium, and there is widespread concern that it will once again be a meeting where the United States is scornful of its allies and partners. Some even fear that this may be the beginning of the end of NATO and the bond between the United States and Europe. The flames have been fanned further by the recent G-7 meeting which ended in acrimony between the US president and the other leaders, the announced Trump-Putin summit in Helsinki a few days after the NATO summit, and whispers that the United States may pull its troops out of Germany in the coming years.

Read More

Few observers believe that the agreement signed between US President Donald J. Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un in Singapore on June 12 will result in North Korea actually giving up its nuclear weapons. But, oddly, some observers—not just the administration’s boosters—have praised the agreement anyway because they argue it makes peace more likely. The opposite is true: Trump and Kim’s rash and meaningless gesture has now made war more likely.

Read More

As the NATO summit nears, attention has been focused on the defense spending of European NATO members and whether the Alliance has been “too costly for the United States,” as claimed by US President Donald J. Trump. Long-standing burden-sharing concerns have morphed into larger disagreements on the value the United States gets from being part of NATO.

The Alliance, however, is more than just a defense mechanism for continental Europe. It is a major provider of security around the world. Since the end of the Cold War, NATO has expanded its mission to address threats outside of Europe and protect its members from a wide range of security challenges.

Read More