Libya

  • Trump on Libya: What Now?

    The situation in Libya seems to be simultaneously stalemated and wavering on the brink of collapse. The Presidential Council and Government of National Accord (PC/GNA), which emerged from the UN-led Libyan Political Agreement at the end of 2015, has made little progress in solidifying its authority in the country. The United Nations is increasingly weak in Libya, with no clear replacement for Special Representative Martin Kobler, whose mandate expires soon. Meanwhile, Field Marshal Khalifa Haftar, who is allied with the House of Representatives in the east and leads the Libyan National Army, continues to refuse to come to a deal with the PC/GNA, perhaps based on the false assumption that he can take control of the country militarily. The recent clashes in the south of the country near Sebha between Haftar’s forces and militias loyal to the PC/GNA are an indicator of the dangers of escalation in the country’s conflict. There is an ever-growing risk of civil war in Libya. Indeed, PC/GNA head Fayez al-Serraj called this week on the international community to intervene in Libya to prevent further destabilization in the south and a possible outbreak of war.

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  • Eljarh Quoted by Agence France-Presse on Clashes Between Rival Government Forces in Libya


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  • 218TV Highlights Atlantic Council Event on Prospects for Ending the Civil War in Libya


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  • Miller in the Arab Weekly: UN Leadership Is Latest Casualty in Libya


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  • Mezran Quoted by Foreign Policy on Tribal Peace Agreement in Libya


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  • The Failed Serraj Experiment of Libya

    On March 30, 2016, Prime Minister Fayez al-Serraj and a few other members of Libya’s Presidency Council (PC) and Government of National Accord (GNA), the two government bodies that the UN-brokered Libyan Political Agreement (LPA) established, arrived to Tripoli’s Abu Sita navy base after having operated in Tunisia for three months. While the international media and diplomats cheered the move as a major step toward stabilizing Libya, it was actually the beginning of the end the GNA and PC.

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  • Miller in the Arab Weekly: International Rhetoric on Libya is More of the Same


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  • Fighting ISIS in Libya

    Libyan foreign minister seeks US engagement in effort to root out terrorists

    Amid concern that the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) is regrouping in Libya, Mohamed Taher Syala, the foreign minister in Libya’s internationally recognized, Tripoli-based Government of National Accord (GNA), said the United States must remain committed to defeating the terrorists in his country.

    More than five years after its longtime ruler, Moammar Gadhafi, was ousted and killed in an Arab Spring-inspired uprising, Libya remains mired in chaos. It has two rival governments and is awash in weapons and independent militias. ISIS has sought to exploit this chaos in the North African nation.

    In the summer of 2016, the United States conducted drone strikes against ISIS targets in the coastal city of Sirte. Troops loyal to the GNA—mostly militias from the western city of Misrata—also helped shatter ISIS’ control over its stronghold in Sirte.

    Syala praised the US military intervention. “Without those attacks, it would be very difficult for our forces to conquer Daesh in that area,” he said in an interview with the New Atlanticiston March 23. ISIS is also known as Daesh.

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  • Mezran in Foreign Policy: Libya Can’t Save Itself


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  • Sixth Anniversary of the US-Libya Intervention: A Model for the Future

    Six years ago on March 19, 2011, the United States started its military intervention in Libya. In 2009, President Obama, in his inauguration speech, addressed the world’s dictators asking them to “unclench their fist” and said  that “America is a friend of each nation and every man, woman and child who seeks a future of peace and dignity.” This was not just a statement by the Democrat president; it was a renewed commitment from the leader of the free world. In 2005, President George W. Bush in his second inauguration speech also said, to those living under tyranny that “… the United States will not ignore your oppression, or excuse your oppressors. When you stand for your liberty, we will stand with you.” To the people living under dictatorships, these promises matter.

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