Mexico

  • USMCA: The New North American Trade Deal

    Just minutes before the September 30 deadline, the United States and Canada – following the US-Mexico deal – reached a new trade accord that modernizes the nearly 25-year-old North American Free Trade Agreement. The newly rebranded United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement is now set to be signed before December 1, 2018. The Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center, in partnership with the Atlantic Council’s Global Business and Economics Program held a rapid reaction conference call on Tuesday, October 2 to discuss key points of the deal and the implications for the future of North American relations. Below is the audio recording and summary.

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  • A Modernized NAFTA

    The new trade agreement between the United States, Canada, and Mexico “modernizes” the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and lifts a cloud of uncertainty that has lingered over the past several months, according to Earl Anthony Wayne, a nonresident senior fellow with the Atlantic Council’s Global Business and Economics Program.

    In negotiations that went down to the wire, Canada agreed on September 30 to join the United States and Mexico in a revised version of NAFTA. The new agreement will be referred to as the United State-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA).

    “Overall, each of the three countries showed flexibility, can claim wins from the new agreement, and gave up preferred positions to reach agreement,” said Wayne, who served as the US ambassador to Mexico from 2011 to 2015.

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  • Meet the New NAFTA: The United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement

    Canada agreed, moments before the clock ran out on a September 30 deadline, to sign on to a trade agreement between the United States and Mexico that would replace the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). The new agreement will be known as the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement or USMCA.

    US President Donald J. Trump announced the deal at the White House on October 1 describing it as a “brand new deal to terminate and replace NAFTA.” With this breakthrough, Trump has fulfilled his campaign promise to rewrite NAFTA, which he has called “the worst trade deal in history.” The new agreement was negotiated “on the principle of fairness and reciprocity,” said Trump.

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  • Conference Call: US-Mexico Trade Deal: Implications and Next Steps

    On Monday, August 27, 2018, President Trump announced that the United States and Mexico reached a deal on several contentious issues in NAFTA, calling it the United States-Mexico Trade Agreement. The Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center, in partnership with the Atlantic Council’s Global Business and Economics Program held a conference call the following day to discuss the implications on NAFTA’s three parties, their respective bilateral relations, and the overall future of North American relations.

    The call featured the following speakers: Jason Marczak, director of the Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center; Valeria Moy, nonresident fellow of the Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center Atlantic Council and director of México, ¿Cómo vamos?; Miguel Noyola, partner and member of the Global International Commercial and Trade Practice Group at Baker McKenzie; and Bart Oosterveld, the C. Boyden Gray fellow on Global Finance and Growth and director of Global Business & Economics Program Atlantic Council.

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  • NAFTA: The End?

    Now that the United States and Mexico have reached a bilateral trade agreement, the focus shifts to Canada—the third partner in the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

    “Reaching a US-Mexico trade deal is critical for the US and Mexican economies and for the millions of US workers who depend on trade with our southern neighbor. But it would be a real loss to not incorporate Canada—the number one destination of US exports,” said Jason Marczak, director of the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center.

    “Across the United States, communities depend on US-Mexico trade and also a smooth functioning trilateral accord,” he added.

    NAFTA, which was signed in 1993, however, may well be entering its final days.

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  • Marczak Quoted in Reuters on Trump Administration Officials Planned Meeting with Mexico's President-Elect


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  • AMLO's Election: What Does it Mean for Mexico, NAFTA, and Beyond?

    On July 12, the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center hosted an event titled, “AMLO’s Election: What Does it Mean for Mexico, NAFTA, and Beyond?” The event explored the aftermath of President-elect Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s (AMLO) historic election on July 1, 2018 and its impact on the future Mexican domestic policy and hemispheric relations. Mexico has seen positive advancements in recent years, including a flourishing startup-culture, increased access to technology and innovation, and high degrees of civic engagement and grassroots activism. Despite this progress, deep-rooted, systematic problems remained at the forefront of voters’ minds: crime and insecurity, corruption, and a stagnant economy.

    The panel featured experts with diverse backgrounds in Mexican political affairs, including: Dr. Paula Stern, Chairwoman and founder of the Stern Group, Inc. and former-Chairwoman of the US International Trade Commission; José Díaz Briseño, Washington, D.C. correspondent for Reforma; Dr. Antonio Ortiz-Mena, Senior Vice President at Albright Stonebridge Group and former-Head of Economic Affairs at the Embassy of Mexico in the United States; and Jason Marczak, Director of the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center. The panelist discussion and Q&A was moderated by Katherine Pereira, Associate Director of the Atlantic Council’s Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center.

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  • Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s First 100 Days

    Mexico is poised for a new era of prosperity if deep structural issues are adequately addressed.


    In this Spotlight, we ask: What are four of the top issues President-elect López Obrador might prioritize in his first 100 days in office?

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  • Marczak in The Hill: Mexicans voted for change — now what?


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  • AMLO's Turn: Challenges for the Next Mexican President

    After overturning the Mexican political establishment and capturing an astounding fifty-three percent of the vote, President-elect Andrés Manuel López Obrador must face his next challenge: governing.

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