Atlantic Council

Press Releases

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

WASHINGTON – The Atlantic Council today named one of the United States’ most accomplished diplomats, Francis J. Ricciardone, Jr., as a vice president and director of its Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East. Ricciardone, who currently serves as the US ambassador to Turkey, will join the Council in September.

“At a crucial moment in the history of the Middle East, Ambassador Ricciardone brings to the Atlantic Council rich leadership experience from some of the world's most demanding places,” said Frederick Kempe, president and CEO of the Atlantic Council.

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New Cyber Risk Report Finds the World Living in Cyber Subprime

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 16, 2014

CONTACTS
Taleen Ananian: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , 202.778.4993
Jennifer Schneider Nowacki: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , 847.275.4428

Groundbreaking, new Atlantic Council - Zurich Insurance Group report identifies aggregate of interconnected risk that "can no longer be ignored"

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 15, 2014

CONTACT
Taleen Ananian

202.778.4993,  This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.  

Barroso, Hagel Among Recipients of Atlantic Council Honors, April 30
Evening includes tribute to EU and NATO enlargements; performance by Ukraine’s Ruslana 

WASHINGTON – The Atlantic Council on April 30 will present its annual Distinguished Leadership Awards to Chuck HagelJosé Manuel Barroso, Thomas EndersRuslana Lyzhychko, andJoseph F. Dunford, Jr., and will also pay tribute to historic European Union and NATO enlargements at a time when democracy in Europe’s east is challenged.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 14, 2014

CONTACT
Taleen Ananian
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , 202.778.4993

WASHINGTON - The Atlantic Council today named John E. Herbst, a former ambassador to Ukraine and Uzbekistan, as director of its Dinu Patriciu Eurasia Center, effective May 12. In that role, Herbst will oversee the Atlantic Council's response to rising tensions with Russia over Ukraine as well as other key economic, security, and political issues across the region, including oversight of the annual Atlantic Council Energy and Economic Summit in Istanbul on November 20-21.

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
April 11, 2014

WASHINGTON – Following the release of the second installment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's Fifth Assessment Report and renewed calls for a comprehensive international climate agreement, the Atlantic Council's Energy and Environment Program has produced a paper describing the political and legal realities constraining formal participation by the United States and proposing a technology-driven alternative for US leadership built on coal as an essential mainstay in the world's energy mix and supported by the further development and broader deployment of advanced coal technologies, which allow coal to meet environmental goals in balance with energy, economic, and security priorities.

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Economist Megan Greene argues for more long-term planning to prevent future crises.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 25, 2014

WASHINGTON – In an issue brief released today, Atlantic Council Senior Fellow Megan Greene argues that the European banking union agreement as it currently stands will fall short of many of its goals and will only to be useful in the next crisis, not in definitively ending the current one. A slew of unresolved issues will not be tackled, such as what to do with banks’ non-performing loans (NPLs) so the banks might start lending again and how to break the doom loop between banks and sovereigns.
 
The first step toward establishing a sound banking union is for the European Central Bank to examine the eurozone’s systemically important banks and make sure they are healthy before the single supervisory mechanism (SSM) takes over responsibility for overseeing the banks in January 2015. This will be done through an Asset Quality Review (AQR) to be completed by mid-2014 and stress tests conducted with the European Banking Authority by November 2014. The AQR is almost guaranteed to be a flawed process.
 

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Stakeholder survey shows narrower agreement and longer negotiations now seen likely; transatlantic discord takes a toll


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Monday, March 24
 
WASHINGTON – Stakeholders remain optimistic that a Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) deal can be reached, but they believe a less comprehensive agreement will result from more protracted talks, according to an Atlantic Council-Bertelsmann Foundation survey released today on the eve of the US-EU summit. The survey, a follow-up to a similar 2013 poll, gauges the attitudes of more than 300 individuals on both sides of the Atlantic nearly one year after formal TTIP negotiations began. TTIP will be on the agenda at the March 26 Brussels summit.

Despite transatlantic controversies such as the NSA scandal, 85 percent of stakeholders believe the US and EU will reach an agreement, compared to 88 percent one year ago. Such support, however, comes with caveats. Only 29 percent of respondents believe a broad, comprehensive agreement will be reached, while 57 percent expect a "moderate" accord, which would omit some of the most contentious issues. Last year, 37 percent predicted a broad agreement and 55 percent a moderate one.
 
A quick deal is now also seen as less likely. A plurality of 29 percent believe an agreement will take effect in 2016. Last year, 28 percent foresaw negotiations wrapping up in 2015.
 
Stakeholders also believe the US and EU public have not been sufficiently informed about TTIP. Sixty percent of European respondents believe their governments have not clearly explained an agreement's advantages and disadvantages. Forty-six percent of US respondents believe Washington has not done enough to explain the impact of a TTIP on everyday Americans.
 
The survey solicited opinions on nineteen policy areas that may be included in an agreement. Respondents were asked to rate each area in terms of its importance in a final accord and the degree of difficulty for finding common ground. The elimination or significant reduction of tariffs across most sectors was deemed the most important issue for a TTIP, followed closely by convergence on three issues: regulatory regimes and standards for manufactured goods, regulatory processes for most sectors, and crossborder information flows and digital trade.   
 
Market access for genetically modified organisms and hormone-treated agricultural products was again deemed the most difficult aspect of TTIP negotiations, followed by data protection and privacy standards, environmental standards, and financial-services regulation.
 
The survey, conducted via e-mail by the Atlantic Council and the Bertelsmann Foundation from February 25-March 7, 2014, included trade-policy experts and observers of transatlantic relations in government, business, academia, and the media.

Read the full report here.
 
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 The Atlantic Council is a nonpartisan organization that promotes constructive US leadership and engagement in international affairs based on the central role of the Atlantic community in meeting today’s global challenges. For more information, please visit AtlanticCouncil.org.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 19, 2014

CONTACT
Taleen Ananian
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. , 202.778.4993

WASHINGTON The Atlantic Council is now accepting applications to the NATO Emerging Leaders Working Group on the Transatlantic Bond, a unique, nonpartisan initiative to renew and support the transatlantic alliance. 

As heads of state from all twenty-eight NATO nations convene at the NATO Summit in Wales this September, the Alliance is seeking input and proposals from emerging leaders on ways NATO must adapt to twenty-first century challenges and emerging issues. NATO has tapped the Atlantic Council to convene and facilitate the Emerging Leaders Working Group, which will complement two other groups commissioned by NATO.

“With a view to our NATO Summit in Wales, and considering the link across the Atlantic that NATO embodies,” said NATO Secretary General Anders Fogh Rasmussen, “I have asked three groups – the NATO Parliamentary Assembly, a group of experts, and a group of young leaders – to consider how we can strengthen our Trans-Atlantic bond and strengthen our security today and tomorrow.”

Following a competitive application process, fifteen leaders between the ages of twenty-five and thirty-five from NATO member countries will be selected to participate in the working group. The group will travel to Washington, Brussels, and finally Wales, to devise and present recommendations after meeting with high-level leaders from business, government, and civil society. Ideal candidates are professionals working in a field of relevance to the transatlantic alliance who can contribute substantively to the working group and provide innovative recommendations.

The Working Group will consider issues including:

  • How does the transatlantic relationship need to evolve in the twenty-first century?
  • What are the key challenges that the transatlantic community now faces and is it equipped to deal with them?
  • What are the expectations and demands in North America and Europe, and how can the alliance address them to ensure the transatlantic bond is strengthened?
  • How can the transatlantic community engage a rising generation in the task of securing the alliance for the future?

The deadline to apply is April 3, 2014. For more information and the application, please visit  http://www.atlanticcouncil.org/programs/young-atlanticist-program/nato-emerging-leaders-working-group.

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The Atlantic Council is a nonpartisan organization that promotes constructive US leadership and engagement in international affairs based on the central role of the Atlantic community in meeting today’s global challenges. For more information, please visit AtlanticCouncil.org.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
March 12, 2014

WASHINGTON – Ukraine’s Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk offered to negotiate an “equal partnership” with Russia if it ends its invasion of Crimea, and praised the Western response to the crisis following his talks at the White House.

“I would like to reiterate that we still want to have a free, equal partnership... with Russia. And we can’t do [that] having a military incursion,” Yatsenyuk said at the Atlantic Council Wednesday. “The best strategy is to sit and to negotiate. ... The best approach for Russia is just to stop, and calm down.”
WASHINGTON – During a public address at the Atlantic Council during his visit to Washington today, Moldovan Prime Minister Iurie Leanca  reaffirmed his country’s commitment to Europe and denounced Russian intimidation in Europe’​s east. 

Atlantic Council Chairman Jon M. Huntsman, Jr. introduced the prime minister, urging action and the strategic importance of what is at stake in the region today.

“Today, we are here for Moldova—to discuss the extraordinary progress that Moldova has achieved, and to consider the challenges that lie ahead for Moldova against the backdrop of Russia’s aggression in the wider region,” said Governor Huntsman. “The events happening as we speak should serve to remind us that there is a need, now more than ever, for an engaged transatlantic community.”

Leanca warned the international community of the dangers that “frozen” conflicts in Crimea and Transnistria can perpetuate throughout an entire region.

“The Transnistria conflict is an unresolved conflict that is especially important in the context of what’s happening in Ukraine,“ said Leanca. “These separatist movements are very contagious. In Crimea, we’re seeing an effort to build another Transnistrian conflict. I’m trying to be optimistic and find a solution with the help of the international community.”

His remarks came at the Atlantic Council following meetings with White House and Congressional leadership.

Other panelists at the event included Swedish Ambassador to the United States Björn Lyrvall; Bertelsmann Foundation Executive Director Annette Heuser; and Freedom House President David Kramer. When prompted by Atlantic Council Executive Vice President Damon Wilson to outline what the West can do in the next forty-eight hours, they replied: 

  • Lyrvall: Definitely put in place a ban on visas for Russian officials behind the Crimea invasion  and sign the EU associationagreements as quickly as possible with  Moldova and Georgia.
  •  Heuser: Freeze financial assets and put in place a visa ban, while sending quick aid to Ukraine. NATO leaders should have an urgent meeting and show a physical presence of the transatlantic alliance on the ground in Kyiv.
  •  Kramer: Get the EU to quickly sign association agreements with Moldova and Georgia because Russia will put these countries through torture in the meantime.
  •  Leanca: The United States and European Union must remain consistent and coherent on policies towards Russia and Moldova.

For full event video, please click here.