Frederick Kempe

  • Former Secretary of the Air Force Deborah Lee James Joins Atlantic Council as Board Director and Distinguished Fellow

    WASHINGTON, DC – The Atlantic Council announced today that Deborah Lee James, former secretary of the air force, has joined the Atlantic Council as a board director and its Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security as a distinguished fellow. Secretary James has thirty years of senior national security experience in the federal government and the private sector.

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  • Kempe Joins CNBC to Discuss the Potential Impact of the UK Election on Financial Markets


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  • Ford ‘Disappointed’ by Trump’s Decision to Quit Paris Climate Deal

    While Ford Motor Company is “disappointed” by US President Donald J. Trump’s decision to withdraw from the Paris Climate Accord, it will not impact the company’s strategy to continue working toward technological advances designed to improve customers’ quality of life, William C. Ford, Jr., executive chairman of Ford Motor Company, said at the Atlantic Council on June 5.

    It “would be nice” to see the United States abide by the Paris deal, an international agreement with more than 190 countries committed to reducing their greenhouse-gas emissions, however, the US withdrawal from the accord “doesn’t change anything for us,” said Ford. He insisted his company, which has already made great progress toward clean energy improvements, will continue with business as usual.

    “We are already ahead of where the Paris accords would like us to go,” in terms of environmental regulations, he said.

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  • Statement from Atlantic Council President and CEO Frederick Kempe

    The Atlantic Council strongly condemns the violence that occurred involving protestors and Turkish security personnel Tuesday evening outside an event that the Council was co-hosting for Turkish President Erdoğan.  

    The Atlantic Council has a 55-year history of promoting free speech, peaceful protest and civil dialogue to address global challenges. The Council frequently convenes small, off-the-record sessions such as the one for President Erdoğan, at which he fielded questions that addressed issues ranging from international to domestic challenges.

    Atlantic Council events never endorse a particular speaker but provide an independent platform for leaders to participate in candid conversations. The proper authorities will determine what, if any, actions should be taken in response to the violence. Such behavior only detracts from the Council’s foundational mission of promoting constructive US leadership alongside friends and allies to secure the future.

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  • Atlantic Council’s Istanbul Summit Affirms Transatlantic Engagement

    Speakers at the Atlantic Council’s Istanbul Summit on April 27 emphasized the importance of strengthening transatlantic bonds to the Middle East with the goal of jointly addressing challenges and harnessing opportunities.

    “We all need each other, and we are strong when we can work together, and pull in the same direction, and address the many challenges in the three regions,” said John Bass, the US ambassador to Turkey.

    “We’ve got some differences in the meantime, but how we deal with those differences… is an essential piece of what we do,” he added.

    This sentiment reflected the theme of this year’s summit: Strengthening Transatlantic Engagement with a Turbulent Region.

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  • Erdoğan Asks US to End Support for Kurdish Militias, Hand Over Cleric

    Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, speaking at the Atlantic Council’s Istanbul Summit on April 28, urged the United States to end its support for Kurdish rebels in Syria and to extradite a cleric Turkey says orchestrated a failed coup attempt in July of 2016; he also accused some European countries of harboring terrorists. 

    Erdoğan’s remarks offered a preview of his upcoming meeting with US President Donald Trump in Washington on May 16. The Turkish leader had been unsuccessful in his efforts to convince former US President Barack Obama to drop his support for the Kurdish militias who have proven to be one of the most effective forces fighting the Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) in Syria. He was optimistic that he could open a new, and very different, chapter in the US-Turkey relationship with Trump.

    US support for the Kurds could be a sticking point in that relationship. In April, Turkey conducted a series of airstrikes against the Kurdish militias. These operations potentially put Turkey and the United States on a collision course.

    Describing the Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG) and the YPG’s political arm, the Democratic Union party (PYD) as the “aborted children” of the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK)—a group that both the United States and Turkey consider a terrorist organization—Erdoğan said these groups will, sooner or later, “bite the hand that feeds them.”

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  • AIIB: A Platform for US-China Cooperation

    Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank’s president sees an opportunity

    The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) should be a platform for cooperation, not a point of conflict between the United States and China, the bank’s president, Jin Liqun, said at the Atlantic Council in Washington on April 24.

    Former US President Barack Obama’s administration was reluctant to join the AIIB amid concern that China would use the institution to set the global economic agenda at the cost of environmental protections, human rights, anticorruption measures, and governance standards.

    Jin recalled that in his conversations with Obama administration officials he often made the point that China was eager to work with the United States to create the AIIB. “When China and the US work together, wonderful things [will] happen,” he said.

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  • Making the Case for Multilateralism

    European Investment Bank President Werner Hoyer cites the importance of explaining the values of international cooperation


    World leaders must reaffirm the importance of a cooperative international system and the tangible benefits to all stakeholders, Werner Hoyer, president of the European Investment Bank (EIB), said at the Atlantic Council on April 21.

    While the surge of populism throughout Europe—in response to terrorism and economic stagnation—means that “renationalization is visible,” particularly in France during an election year, Hoyer insisted that when “the cooperative approach and the multilateral approach is being put into question in an irresponsible way… it is important to explain again the values of international cooperation.”

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  • Kempe Joins CNBC to Discuss Geopolitical Risk and Market Risk


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  • Innovation Key to Maintaining US Defense Leadership

    The United States’ role as a global leader in defense is not “automatic,” it must be maintained and improved by building bridges between the technology and security sectors to encourage innovation in military operations, former US Defense Secretary Ash Carter said at the Atlantic Council on April 4.

    While the US military “is the finest fighting force the world has ever known,” Carter said, “that excellence is not a birthright; it’s not automatic.” He called for the federal government to invest in innovation technology to meet an uncertain future. “I believe that we need to ensure that our innovative engine works… to bring innovation and public purpose together,” he said.

    Carter delivered the keynote address at the launch of an Atlantic Council report, Keeping America’s Innovative Edge, authored by Peter Engelke, a senior fellow with the Atlantic Council’s Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security, and Robert A. Manning, a senior fellow with the Scowcroft Center and its Foresight, Strategy, and Risks Initiative. The report is the culmination of a year-long effort, as part of a two-year partnership with Qualcomm.

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