Subscribe to New Atlanticist

Sign up for the New Atlanticist newsletter, which showcases expert analysis from the Atlantic Council community on the most important global issues. Featuring breaking news reactions, opinion pieces, explainers, and focused analyses, New Atlanticist provides a comprehensive look at the top global headlines and the challenges facing the international community.


Content

Thu, Jan 23, 2020

A year in, the United States still stands behind Venezuela’s interim government

As the interim government of Venezuela continues to fight for freedom and democracy against the regime of Nicolás Maduro, the United States is “unwavering in [its] commitment” to helping Interim President Juan Guaidó and the National Assembly, US Agency for International Development (USAID) Administrator Mark Green said on January 23.

New Atlanticist by David A. Wemer

Democratic Transitions Human Rights

Wed, Jan 22, 2020

Europe to take center stage in global trade talks

With the “phase one” trade deal behind them, the United States and China will now probably shift attention to sorting out their economic and trade relationships with Europe. Caught in the middle of the US-China trade war and geopolitical competition, the European Union (EU) has tried to steer an independent course, balancing security and geopolitical concerns with economic and business needs. Doing so, however, has exposed many differences vis-a-vis the United States as well as China.

New Atlanticist by Hung Tran

China European Union

Tue, Jan 21, 2020

Trump hails “time for optimism” on climate change, but US leadership still missing

While “Trump is right [that] this is a time for both optimism and action,” John E. Morton, a nonresident senior fellow with the Atlantic Council’s Global Energy Center, said, Trump “is wrong to suggest that the future lies in fossil fuels.” By emphasizing fossil fuel production, Livingston said, “Trump missed a key opportunity to sell the story of a United States that can still—with the right policies—commercialize zero-carbon technologies as well as any other country in the world.”

New Atlanticist by David A. Wemer

Climate Change & Climate Action Energy Transitions

Tue, Jan 21, 2020

The Pakistani courts strike back

The historic sentencing in December of former dictator and president Pervez Musharraf was a blow to the military’s image and directly questions its unequivocal authority over shaping Pakistan’s political life—even if it is only symbolic. In a rare streak of defiance, the country’s courts are pushing back against a traditionally powerful and popular establishment hoping to inch the country from a seemingly illiberal to a more liberal democracy.

New Atlanticist by Fatima Salman

Democratic Transitions Pakistan

Tue, Jan 21, 2020

The economic battleground between China and the United Kingdom

The importance of the Shanghai-London Stock Connect suspension will depend on whether additional policy moves targeting large British firms will follow. In terms of tangible effects, this event causes little economic disruption, but is probably the most symbolically important use of Chinese financial sanctions thus far.

New Atlanticist by Michael Greenwald

China Financial Regulation

Fri, Jan 17, 2020

Berlin conference: The end of the game?

The upcoming conference could result in the acceptance by all of Haftar’s future role in Libya and the legitimization of his attack against Tripoli. The Berlin conference could be a trap for the GNA, the courageous fighters of Tripoli, and the population of western Libya.

New Atlanticist by Karim Mezran

Conflict Libya

Fri, Jan 17, 2020

Khamenei’s rare sermon shows Tehran’s continued defiance

Khameinei's January 17 speech shows that "those placing hopes in recent protests in Iran to shake—or even overturn—the system underestimate its power and ruthlessness," Barbara Slavin explains.

New Atlanticist by Atlantic Council

Conflict Iran

Thu, Jan 16, 2020

The effect of US sanctions on the Iran-Iraq alliance

The potential sanctions against Iraq under consideration now could damage the United States’ goals in that country and would only embolden Iran’s position—the exact scenario that US policy has tried to avoid. Economic countermeasures, such as restrictions to Iraq’s Federal Reserve accounts—could not only cede economic clout within Iraq to Tehran but could also have significant impact on the US dollar's global position.

New Atlanticist by Michael Greenwald

Economic Sanctions

Wed, Jan 15, 2020

Spain’s new government a welcome sign, but Madrid must navigate several fault lines

After two general elections in nine months, Spain finally has a government. But the new coalition is a fragile one that will have to deploy creative solutions to address fragmentation along three dimensions: political, territorial, and social. It will be challenging, but it may work.

New Atlanticist by Antonio de Lecea

Elections Politics & Diplomacy

Wed, Jan 15, 2020

At the beginning of 2020, what are the global risks and growth prospects for the Euro Area?

After the high real growth of the EA in 2015 (averaging slightly more than 2% per year), growth in 2019-20 has been downgraded as several risks materialized. Furthermore, the balance of persistent global or domestic risks remain negative even if less than last year.

New Atlanticist by Marc-Olivier Strauss-Kahn

European Union International Markets