September 15 marks the 200th anniversary of Central American Independence. While this year’s celebrations are happening alongside many urgent challenges, citizens continue to work for a more democratic and prosperous Central America. There is also renewed US impetus to advance its partnership to help citizens build better futures in their own countries.

What can the US government and international community do to better promote democracy, economic development, transparency, rule of law, and human rights in Central America? How can Central American leaders better work together to maintain stability through strong democratic institutions? What steps need to be taken today and what does the region need from its most important allies and partners?

In the spirit of the Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center’s forward-looking Central America work, join us on Wednesday, September 15 from 4:00 to 5:00 p.m. ET, for a virtual celebration of 200 years of independence and a public conversation on what lies ahead for the region.

This event, part of the Center’s broader programming for “Central America Week,” will include a featured conversation with Acting Assistant Secretary and Special Envoy for the Northern Triangle Ricardo Zúniga and a conversation with ambassadors from the region who currently serve in Washington DC.

Speakers

Ricardo Zúniga
Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs
US Department of State

Ambassador Alfonso Quiñónez
Ambassador of Guatemala to the United States

Ambassador Fernando Llorca
Ambassador of Costa Rica to the United States

The Adrienne Arsht Latin America Center broadens understanding of regional transformations through high-impact work that shapes the conversation among policymakers, the business community, and civil society. The Center focuses on Latin America’s strategic role in a global context with a priority on pressing political, economic, and social issues that will define the trajectory of the region now and in the years ahead. Select lines of programming include: Venezuela’s crisis; Mexico-US and global ties; China in Latin America; Colombia’s future; a changing Brazil; Central America’s trajectory; Caribbean development; commercial patterns shifts; energy resources; and disinformation.