Issue Brief

  • All Africa Features Africa Center's New Report on Economic Impact


    Read More
  • Post-Sanctions Economic Opportunities and Risks in Iran

    pdfRead the Publication (PDF)

    On January 16, 2016, the International Atomic Energy Agency verified that Iran had implemented key measures under the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action. As a result, nuclear-related sanctions previously imposed by the United Nations, the European Union, and the United States were lifted. The removal of these sanctions opens up a wide range of possibilities for investment in and trade with Iran.

    Read More
  • Foreign Policy for an Urban World: Global Governance and the Rise of Cities

    In the latest FutureScape issue brief from the Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security's Strategic Foresight Initiative, author Peter Engelke discusses the long-term economic, environmental, and policy implications of urbanization. Entitled "Foreign Policy for an Urban World: Global Governance and the Rise of Cities," the brief examines how urbanization is hastening the global diffusion of power and how cities themselves are increasingly important nodes of power in global politics.

    pdfDownload PDF

    Read More
  • Reforming Tunisia's Troubled Security Sector

    In a new Atlantic Council issue brief titled “Reforming Tunisia’s Troubled Security Sector,” Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East nonresident fellow and security sector reform activist Bassem Bouguerra explains the barriers to reforming the North African country’s troubled security apparatus and offers possible paths forward for reform.
     
    pdfRead the Issue Brief (PDF)

    Read More
  • A Blueprint for a Comprehensive US Counterterrorism Strategy in Yemen

    A new Atlantic Council issue brief argues that current US counterterrorism efforts in Yemen fail to address deeper structural issues that foment extremism and destabilize Yemen's central government.

    In “A Blueprint for a Comprehensive US Counterterrorism Strategy in Yemen,” former US Ambassador to Yemen Barbara K. Bodine and Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East Deputy Director Danya Greenfield contend that any US counterterrorism strategy to stem the growth of extremist groups and potential state failure in Yemen must address underlying economic and political issues. The authors outline a long-term and comprehensive approach that provides increased and consistent level of financial and technical assistance to address the pervasive lack of economic opportunity, structural unemployment, cronyism, and inequitable distribution of state resources.

    ...

    Read More
  • Do Drone Strikes in Yemen Undermine US Security Objectives?

    Despite President Obama’s assertion that the United States’ counterterrorism strategy targeting militants in Yemen and Somalia provide a “successful” model to be emulated in its fight against ISIS, a new Atlantic Council issue brief assesess the use of drones and the US strategy in Yemen, and argues this approach is shortsighted and threatens US national security objectives.

    In “Do Drone Strikes in Yemen Undermine US Security Objectives?” Rafik Hariri Center for the Middle East Deputy Director Danya Greenfield and Assistant Director Stefanie A. Hausheer argue that the US drone program in Yemen undermines long-term US national security objectives, citing the negative impact of civilian casualties, intelligence and targeting mistakes, and the rise of anti-American sentiment that can increase safe havens for extremist groups.

    ...

    Read More
  • The Future of US Extended Deterrence in Asia to 2025

    US leadership, undergirded by the US military, has played a central role in ensuring the stability necessary to produce remarkable economic and political transformations in Northeast Asia. More specifically, American commitments to defend its allies in Northeast Asia, with nuclear weapons if necessary, have deterred major power war, prevented regional conflict, stemmed nuclear proliferation, and limited the use of coercion. Over time, however, US security commitments to the region have become increasingly interwoven within a more comprehensive and multifaceted fabric, with US conventional and nuclear forces still at their foundation, but supplemented by allied capabilities, commercial interdependence, and evolving regional institutions.

    But US extended deterrence in East Asia—an essential ingredient to sustain regional peace and prosperity—is increasingly under strain. Revitalizing the strength of US security commitments is therefore a first-order task in Washington’s...

    Read More
  • ISIS War Game: The Coming Stalemate

    On September 22, the Atlantic Council’s Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security conducted a war game to examine the type of strategic interaction that might ensue between the US-led coalition and Islamic State in Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) fighters over the next six months. The latest issue brief from the Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security, "ISIS War Game: The Coming Stalemate" summarizes the results of this simulation, examines possible outcomes in the conflict, and explains key takeaways for the Obama administration as it carries out its offensive against ISIS in Iraq and Syria.

    pdfRead the Issue Brief (PDF)

    War game participants included senior Iraq and Syria analysts–some from the region,...

    Read More
  • NATO’s Cyber Capabilities: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow

    For over a decade, NATO has greatly improved its cyber capabilities. In a new issue brief, “NATO’s Cyber Capabilities: Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow,” Jason Healey, director, and Klara Tothova Jordan, assistant director of the Cyber Statecraft Initiative in the Brent Scowcroft Center on International Security at the Atlantic Council, argue that there is still much that NATO can and should do to reinforce the Alliance’s cyber defenses.

    pdfRead the Issue Brief (PDF)

    Read More
  • Why Nuclear Deterrence Still Matters to NATO

    Over the past two decades, nuclear weapons have been deemphasized in NATO planning, but this should not be interpreted to mean that the Alliance has abandoned the core principle that a nuclear attack will meet a nuclear response, or that NATO will not retain the necessary means to deliver such a response.

    pdfRead the Issue Brief (PDF)

    Read More