Russia Sanctions Revisited

July 19, 2017 - 3:30 pm

Atlantic Council, 1030 15th St NW (12th Floor)
Washington, DC
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Russia Sanctions Revisited


Opening remarks by:
Daniel Yergin
Vice Chairman
IHS Markit

A conversation with:
Ambassador Daniel Fried (Ret.)
Distinguished Fellow, Future Europe Initiative and
Dinu Patriciu Eurasia Center

Atlantic Council

Ambassador Richard Morningstar (Ret.)
Founding Director and Chairman, Global Energy Center
Atlantic Council

David Mortlock
Senior Fellow, Global Energy Center
Atlantic Council

Jeffrey Turner
Managing Partner, Public Policy Practice
Squire Patton Boggs LLP

Moderated by:
Ellen Scholl
Associate Director, Global Energy Center
Atlantic Council

 
Please join the Global Energy Center on Wednesday, July 19, 2017 for a conversation about the recently Senate-passed legislation on Russia sanctions. The ongoing discussions in Congress provide an opportunity to take stock of existing sanctions policy, discuss the proposed legislative changes, and assess the current and future impact of sanctions on Russia’s energy sector.


On Twitter? Follow @AtlanticCouncil and use #ACenergy

Atlantic Council
1030 15th Street NW, 12th Floor (West Tower Elevator) 
Washington, DC 

This event is open to press and on the record.
VISITING THE COUNCIL: Metro and parking info

Bios

Daniel Yergin is a highly respected authority on energy, international politics, and economics. He is Vice Chairman of IHS and Founder of IHS Cambridge Energy Research Associates.

In 2014, the Prime Minister of India presented Dr. Yergin with “Lifetime Achievement Award” and the U.S. Department of Energy awarded him the first “James Schlesinger Medal for Energy Security.” A Pulitzer Prize winner, Dr. Yergin is the author of the new bestseller The Quest: Energy, Security, and the Remaking of the Modern World. The Economist described The Quest as “a masterly piece of work” by The Economist and The Financial Times called it “a triumph.” The New York Times said it is “necessary reading for C.E.O.’s, conservationists, lawmakers, generals, spies, tech geeks, thriller writers,” among many others. Dr. Yergin is known around the world for his book The Prize: the Epic Quest for Oil Money and Power, which was awarded the Pulitzer Prize. It became a number one New York Times best seller and has been translated into 20 languages. 

Dr. Yergin is also a business leader, as Vice Chairman of IHS, one of the world’s largest research and information companies, with 9000 employees, and founder of Cambridge Energy Research Associates, which became part of IHS in 2004. Dr. Yergin was awarded the United States Energy Award for “lifelong achievements in energy and the promotion of international understanding.” He received the Charles Percy Award for Public Service from the Alliance to Save Energy. The International Association for Energy Economics gave Dr. Yergin its 2012 award for “outstanding contributions to the profession of energy economics and to its literature.”

Dr. Yergin serves on the US Secretary of Energy Advisory Board and chaired the US Department of Energy’s Task Force on Strategic Energy Research and Development. Dr. Yergin is a director of the Council on Foreign Relations and a trustee of the Brookings Institution. He is a member of the National Petroleum Council, a director of the United States Energy Association, the New America Foundation, and of the US-Russia Business Council. He is a member of the Advisory Boards of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Energy Initiative and of the Columbia University Center on Global Energy Policy and of Singapore’s International Energy Advisory Board. He is a “Wise Man” of the International Gas Union and a member of the Russian Academy of Oil and Gas. In 2012 he became an Adjunct Professor at the China University of Petroleum in Beijing. Dr. Yergin holds a BA from Yale University, where he founded The New Journal, and a PhD from Cambridge University, where he was a Marshall Scholar.

Ambassador Daniel Fried played a key role in designing and implementing American policy in Europe after the fall of the Soviet Union.  As special assistant and NSC senior director for Presidents Clinton and Bush, ambassador to Poland, and assistant secretary of state for Europe (2005-09), Ambassador Fried crafted the policy of NATO enlargement to Central European nations and, in parallel, NATO-Russia relations, thus advancing the goal of Europe whole, free, and at peace. During those years, the West’s community of democracy and security grew in Europe. Ambassador Fried helped lead the West’s response to Moscow’s aggression against Ukraine starting in 2014: as State Department coordinator for sanctions policy, he crafted US sanctions against Russia, the largest US sanctions program to date, and negotiated the imposition of similar sanctions by Europe, Canada, Japan, and Australia. Ambassador Fried became one of the US government’s foremost experts on Central and Eastern Europe and Russia. While a student, he lived in Moscow, majored in Soviet studies and history at Cornell University (BA magna cum laude 1975), and received an MA from Columbia’s Russian Institute and School of International Affairs in 1977. He joined the US Foreign Service later that year, serving overseas in Leningrad (human rights, Baltic affairs, and consular officer), and Belgrade (political officer), and in the Office of Soviet Affairs in the State Department.  

As Polish desk officer in the late 1980s, Fried was one of the first in Washington to recognize the impending collapse of Communism in Poland, and helped develop the immediate response of the George H.W. Bush Administration to these developments. As political counselor at the US Embassy in Warsaw (1990-93), Fried witnessed Poland’s difficult but ultimately successful free market, democratic transformation, working with successive Polish governments. 

Ambassador Fried also served as the State Department’s first special envoy for the closure of the Guantanamo (GTMO) Detainee Facility. He established procedures for the transfer of individual detainees and negotiated the transfers of seventy detainees to twenty countries, with improved security outcomes.   

Dan Fried has been married to Olga Karpiw since 1979; they have two children (Hannah and Sophie), and are the besotted grandparents of Ava Helen Fried Hanley

Richard L. Morningstar is the founding director and chairman of the Global Energy Center at the Atlantic Council. He served as the US ambassador to the Republic of Azerbaijan from July 2012 to August 2014. Prior to his appointment, since April 2009, he was the secretary of state's special envoy for Eurasian energy. Prior to that, Morningstar lectured at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard and Stanford Law School. From June 1999 to September 2001, he served as US ambassador to the European Union. Prior to this, Morningstar served as special adviser to the president and secretary of state for Caspian Basin energy diplomacy, where he was responsible for assuring maximum coordination within the executive branch and with other governments and international organizations to promote US policies on Caspian Basin energy development and transportation. From April 1995 to July 1998, he served as ambassador and special adviser to the president and secretary of state on assistance for the new independent states (NIS) of the former Soviet Union, where he oversaw all US bilateral assistance and trade investment activities in the NIS. From 1993 to 1995, he served as senior vice president of the Overseas Private Investment Corporation (OPIC). Morningstar also served as chairman of the board and chief executive officer of the Costar Corporation from 1990 to 1993 and as president and chief executive officer from 1981 to 1990. He was an attorney with Peabody and Brown (now Nixon and Peabody) in Boston from 1970 to 1981, where he became a partner in 1977. Morningstar served as a commissioner of the National Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws (1989–93). Prior to returning to the government in 2009, he served as director of the American Councils for International Education, a trustee of the Kosovo-America Educational Foundation, and a trustee of the Eurasia Foundation. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Morningstar received his BA from Harvard in 1967 and JD from Stanford Law School in 1970.

David Mortlock is a Nonresident Senior Fellow with the Atlantic Council’s Global Energy Center. He is a partner at the law firm Willkie Farr & Gallagher, where he focuses on sanctions, export controls, and other international trade issues. Previously, he was Director for International Economic Affairs at the White House National Security Council.  He has served in various positions at the US Department of State, including Deputy Coordinator for Sanctions Policy and Attorney-Advisor for Sanctions and Terror Finance.  David was centrally involved in the development of the sanctions programs for Russia and Iran, including restrictions on those countries' energy sectors.  He also worked to ease the sanctions programs for Burma and Cuba.

Jeffrey Turner As head of Squire Patton Boggs’ Public Policy Practice, Jeff Turner works with domestic and international clients to advance their business objectives on Capitol Hill and in the executive branch. Collaborating with colleagues in the Public Policy Practice Group, he and his teams help block harmful legislation and regulations, encourage Congress and regulatory agencies to adopt favorable legislation and regulations and navigate the challenges of congressional investigations. He also is responsible for the day-to-day operations of the group. Jeff focuses much of his practice on public policy issues related to tax and trade policy issues, energy legislation, sanctions policy and a host of other public policy issues. In addition, he advises companies in connection with investments and transactions reviewed by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS). Jeff has led teams on “bet-the-company” projects, including ones in which Congress will have a major role in the outcome.

Ellen Scholl is an associate director at the Atlantic Council’s Global Energy Center. Ellen has worked on a range of energy issues throughout her career, most recently as Robert Bosch fellow at the German Institute for International and Security Affairs (SWP) and the Federation of German Industries (BDI). She also has over five years of energy-related legislative experience, having handled an energy portfolio as committee staff for the US Congress and Texas Senate. Her work on energy and geopolitics and energy governance has been published by SWP, and other work has appeared in the Berlin Policy Journal, Foreign Policy, and Lawfare, among others.

Ellen also worked on energy issues as a student fellow with the Robert S. Strauss Center on International Security and Law, and as a member of the inaugural cohort of the US Foreign Service Internship Program, during which she worked in the Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs and at US Embassy Ankara. Ellen received her master’s degree in global policy studies, with a certificate in Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies, from the LBJ School of Public Affairs, where she was a Powers fellow. She earned a BA in humanities and government from the University of Texas at Austin, where she graduated with highest honors.



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